Category: Robert Frost

Critical Analysis of “Out, Out” by Robert Frost

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Mowing by Robert Frost

               Mowing

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Critical analysis of Mowing by Robert Frost

Critical analysis of Mowing by Robert Frost

Summary
On a hot day, when the narrator is working in the field, at that time he notices that his scythe appears to be whispering as it works. But he is unable to understand about the voice of the scythe or he does not realize what the scythe is saying. He confesses the possibility that the whispering sound is simply his imagination or even the result of heatstroke. He again thinks about the sound a scythe makes mowing hay in a field by a forest, and what this sound might signify. He rejects the idea that it speaks of something dreamlike or supernatural, gradually he determines that the scythe may be expressing its own beliefs about the world.

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

BY Robert Frost 

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Critical Analysis of Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost

Critical Analysis of Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost

Summary of this poem: One dark evening, the narrator was going through woods which were filled up with snow. According to his view, it was the darkest evening of the year. So nothing was seen clearly. On the way suddenly he stopped beside a wood which was also covered with snow. But he did not know who the owner of the wood was. He again commanded that the owner did not know about his standing beside his wood because the owner was not present at that place. And nothing was seen from other side of the wood because of snow. 

Critical Analysis of Home Burial by Robert Frost

  Introduction: Robert Frost is a great American poet who has created many creations. Home Burial is one of the greatest creations of him. It is a dramatic dialogue between a husband and with his wife.  

    Form: This poem is considered as a dramatic or pastoral lyric poem in the terms of form, using free-form dialogue rather than strict rhythmic schemes. Frost generally uses five stressed syllables in each line and divides stanzas in terms of lines of speech. Frost splits the iambic pattern in lines 18 and 19, which both emphasizes the couple’s relative, positions physically and provides a graphic illustration of just how far apart they are. Frost also uses this device in lines 31 and 32, 45 and 46, and finally in lines 70 and 71.  Read More

Critical Analysis of Mowing by Robert Frost

Mowing

Robert Frost

There was never a sound beside the wood but one, Read More