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Mar 18

M. Murad

SPEAKING RULES AND ELEMENTS FOR CLASS 6 AND 7

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5 Speaking Rules you need to know(In brief)
1. Don’t study grammar too much
This rule might sound strange to many ESL students, but it is one of the most important rules. If you want to pass examinations, then study grammar. However, if you want to become fluent in English, then you should try to learn English without studying the grammar.

Studying grammar will only slow you down and confuse you. You will think about the rules when creating sentences instead of naturally saying a sentence like a native. Remember that only a small fraction of English speakers know more than 20% of all the grammar rules. Many ESL students know more grammar than native speakers. I can confidently say this with experience. I am a native English speaker, majored in English Literature, and have been teaching English for more than 10 years. However, many of my students know more details about English grammar than I do. I can easily look up the definition and apply it, but I don’t know it off the top of my head.

I often ask my native English friends some grammar questions, and only a few of them know the correct answer. However, they are fluent in English and can read, speak, listen, and communicate effectively.

Do you want to be able to recite the definition of a causative verb, or do you want to be able to speak English fluently?

2. Learn and study phrases
Many students learn vocabulary and try to put many words together to create a proper sentence. It amazes me how many words some of my students know, but they cannot create a proper sentence. The reason is because they didn’t study phrases. When children learn a language, they learn both words and phrases together. Likewise, you need to study and learn phrases.

If you know 1000 words, you might not be able to say one correct sentence. But if you know 1 phrase, you can make hundreds of correct sentences. If you know 100 phrases, you will be surprised at how many correct sentences you will be able to say. Finally, when you know only a 1000 phrases, you will be almost a fluent English speaker.

Don’t translate

When you want to create an English sentence, do not translate the words from your Mother tongue. The order of words is probably completely different and you will be both slow and incorrect by doing this. Instead, learn phrases and sentences so you don’t have to think about the words you are saying. It should be automatic.

Another problem with translating is that you will be trying to incorporate grammar rules that you have learned. Translating and thinking about the grammar to create English sentences is incorrect and should be avoided.
3. Reading and Listening is NOT enough. Practice Speaking what you hear!
Reading, listening, and speaking are the most important aspects of any language. The same is true for English. However, speaking is the only requirement to be fluent. It is normal for babies and children to learn speaking first, become fluent, then start reading, then writing. So the natural order is listening, speaking, reading, then writing.

First Problem
Isn’t it strange that schools across the world teach reading first, then writing, then listening, and finally speaking? Although it is different, the main reason is because when you learn a second language, you need to read material to understand and learn it. So even though the natural order is listening, speaking, reading, then writing, the order for ESL students is reading, listening, speaking, then writing.

Second Problem
The reason many people can read and listen is because that’s all they practice. But in order to speak English fluently, you need to practice speaking. Don’t stop at the listening portion, and when you study, don’t just listen. Speak out loud the material you are listening to and practice what you hear. Practice speaking out loud until your mouth and brain can do it without any effort. By doing so, you will be able to speak English fluently.
4. Submerge yourself
Being able to speak a language is not related to how smart you are. Anyone can learn how to speak any language. This is a proven fact by everyone in the world. Everyone can speak at least one language. Whether you are intelligent, or lacking some brain power, you are able to speak one language.

This was achieved by being around that language at all times. In your country, you hear and speak your language constantly. You will notice that many people who are good English speakers are the ones who studied in an English speaking school. They can speak English not because they went to an English speaking school, but because they had an environment where they can be around English speaking people constantly.

There are also some people who study abroad and learn very little. That is because they went to an English speaking school, but found friends from their own country and didn’t practice English.

You don’t have to go anywhere to become a fluent English speaker. You only need to surround yourself with English. You can do this by making rules with your existing friends that you will only speak English. You can also carry around an iPod and constantly listen to English sentences. As you can see, you can achieve results by changing what your surroundings are. Submerge yourself in English and you will learn several times faster.

5. Study correct material
A common phrase that is incorrect is, “Practice makes perfect.” This is far from the truth. Practice only makes what you are practicing permanent. If you practice the incorrect sentence, you will have perfected saying the sentence incorrectly. Therefore, it is important that you study material that is commonly used by most people.

Another problem I see is that many students study the news. However, the language they speak is more formal and the content they use is more political and not used in regular life. It is important to understand what they are saying, but this is more of an advanced lesson that should be studied after learning the fundamental basics of English.

Studying English with a friend who is not a native English speaker is both good and bad. You should be aware of the pros and cons of speaking with a non native speaking friend. Practicing with a non native person will give you practice. You can also motivate each other and point out basic mistakes. But you might pick up bad habits from one another if you are not sure about what are correct and incorrect sentences. So use these practice times as a time period to practice the correct material you studied. Not to learn how to say a sentence.

In short, study English material that you can trust, that is commonly used, and that is correct.

English Speaking Basics – Section I

English Speaking Basics is for English speaking beginners who need help to understand the basics of speaking English. We will use very simple phrases and expressions to help you with your English speaking.
I’m
‘I’m’ is an abbreviation for the word ‘I AM.’ It is used in combination with other words to tell someone about yourself or to describe something you are doing.

Here are some examples:

“I’m so tired.”
“I’m confused.”
“I’m happy.”
“I’m twenty three years old.”
“I’m hungry.”
“I’m nervous.”
“I’m excited.”
“I’m leaving work.”
“I’m thirsty.”
“I’m from Seattle.”

You can also add descriptive words with ‘I’m’ such as:

“I’m extremely tired.”
“I’m very happy.”
“I’m terribly hungry.”
“I am super excited.”
“I’m very nervous.”

I’m in/at/on
Describes an action you are doing.

Most commonly, you would use the word ‘in’ when entering a physical location such as a room or a building.

Here are some examples:

“I’m in the shower.”
“I’m in the lobby.”
“I’m in a car.”
“I’m in a house.”
“I’m in a school.”

Using the word ‘at’ helps tell someone where you currently are. The difference between ‘at’ and ‘in’ is that the physical location is general.

Here are some examples:

“I’m at the grocery.”
“I’m at the mall.”
“I’m at the doctor’s office.”
“I’m at the park.”
“I’m at the airport.”

However, in some cases you can use ‘at’ and ‘in’ interchangeably.

Here are some examples:

“I’m at the mall.”
“I’m in the mall.”
“I’m at the park.”
“I’m in the park.”
“I’m at the grocery.”
“I’m in the grocery.”

Using the word ‘on’ is referring to a non physical location such as your time being utilized by something else.

Here are some examples:

“I’m on the phone.”
“I’m on my computer.”
“I’m on a bus.”

I’m good at
Again, ‘I’m’ is used here as ‘I am.’ ‘Good at’ informs someone what you excel at and are comfortable doing.

Here are some examples:

“I’m good at drawing.”
“I’m good at video games.”
“I’m good at swimming.”
“I’m good at driving.”
“I’m good at reading.”
“I’m good at sports.”
“I’m good at writing.”
“I’m good at math.”
“I’m good at dancing.”
“I’m good at chess.”

I’m + (verb)
‘I’m’ is a contraction of the words ‘I am.’ By adding a verb to ‘I’m’ this lets you express an action or occurrence about yourself.

Here are some examples:

“I’m eating lunch.”
“I’m brushing my teeth.”
“I’m scared.”
“I’m driving to work.”
“I’m crying.”
“I’m typing an email.”
“I’m cooking dinner.”
“I’m combing my hair.”
“I’m hanging a picture.”
“I am texting.”
“I am dancing.”
“I am interested in the job.”
“I am exercising.”
“I am sad.”
“I am learning.”

I’m getting
When combining the words ‘I am’ and ‘getting’ you are telling someone ‘you’ are gaining possession, being affected by or have plans to seek out and obtain a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“I’m getting better.”
“I’m getting ready for bed.”
“I’m getting a tooth ache.”
“I’m getting a cold.”
“I’m getting married.”
“I’m getting tired.”
“I’m getting good at reading.”
“I’m getting a new car.”
“I’m getting a job.”
“I’m getting a puppy.”

I’m trying + (verb)
‘I am trying’ informs someone that you are attempting to accomplish something using bodily, mental, or spiritual strength. By adding a verb to ‘I’m trying’ you are pointing out exactly what it is you are attempting to do.

Here are some examples:

“I’m trying to get a job.”
“I’m trying to call my family.”
“I’m trying to enjoy my dinner.”
“I’m trying to educate myself.”
“I’m trying to explain myself.”
“I’m trying new food.”
“I’m trying to eat healthy.”
“I’m trying to understand.”

I’m gonna + (verb)
The word ‘gonna’ is incorrect grammatically. The equivalent in proper grammar would be ‘going to.’ When using the word ‘gonna’ you are telling someone what you are planning to do at that moment or in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“I’m gonna have some coffee.”
“I’m gonna go to work.”
“I’m gonna eat some cake.”
“I’m gonna send out my resume.”
“I’m gonna run a marathon.”
“I’m gonna ask her out for dinner.”
“I’m gonna stop smoking.”
“I’m gonna help my friends.”
“I’m gonna take swim lessons.”
“I’m gonna read a book.”

I have + (noun)
By using the words ‘I have’ you are informing someone of something you have possession of or have acquired.

Here are some examples:

“I have a cat.”
“I have a nice car.”
“I have a house.”
“I have a computer.”
“I have a headache.”

You may hear the words ‘cannot’ and ‘won’t’ used with ‘I have.’ By adding these you can express what you will not put up with or allow.

Here are some examples:

“I cannot have that behavior in my house.”
“I cannot have you over tonight.”
“I won’t have anything to do with that.”
“I won’t have it any other way.”

I have + (past participle)
Again, ‘I have’ shows possession or something acquired. By adding a past participle you are informing someone of a past or completed action done by you.

Here are some examples:

“I have done it.”
“I have heard that before.”
“I have driven a car.”
“I have forgotten the words.”
“I have read that book.”
“I have eaten at that restaurant before.”
“I have flown in an airplane.”
“I have forgiven you.”
“I have seen you before.”
“I have written a letter.”

I used to + (verb)

‘Used to’ expresses something that was done in the past, and is not usually done now.

Here are some examples:

“I used to develop websites.”
“I used to jog every day.”
“I used to paint.”
“I used to smoke.”
“I used to work from home.”
“I used to live in California.”
“I used to go to the beach every day.”
“I used to sing in a choir.”
“I used to like vegetables.”
“I used to start work at 6 o’clock.”

“I have to + (verb)
The words ‘have to’ describe something that needs to take place soon. It expresses certainty, necessity, or obligation.

Here are some examples:

“I have to switch schools.”
“I have to use the telephone.”
“I have to go to the bathroom.”
“I have to leave.”
“I have to unpack my bags.”

You can also add the word ‘don’t’ to suggest that someone is not required to do something.

“I don’t have to switch schools.”
“I don’t have to use the telephone.”
“I don’t have to go to the bathroom.”
“I don’t have to leave.”
“I don’t have to unpack my bags.”

I wanna + (verb)
The word ‘wanna’ is incorrect grammatically. It is equivalent to ‘want to.’ When combined with the word ‘I’ it helps communicate something you want to do.

Here are some examples:

“I wanna talk.”
“I wanna search for a job.”
“I wanna order some food.”
“I wanna marry her.”
“I wanna listen to that song.”

By adding the word ‘don’t’ you can change the meaning of what you are saying to something you ‘want’ to do to something you ‘do not’ want to do.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t wanna talk.”
“I don’t wanna search for a job.”
“I don’t wanna marry her.”
“I don’t wanna listen to that song.”
“I don’t wanna order some food.”

I gotta + (verb)
‘I gotta’ is grammatically incorrect. It is more of a spoken form. If you want to say this with proper grammar, the equivalent would be, ‘I have got to’ or ‘I’ve got to’. In the spoken form, ‘got to’ is shortened to ‘gotta’ and the word ‘have’ is dropped.

Here are some examples:

“I gotta manage my money.”
“I gotta obey the laws.”
“I gotta move to a bigger house.”
“I gotta impress my boss.”
“I gotta brush my teeth.”

By adding the word ‘have’ you can change what you are saying to express something that needs to be done in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“I have got to be on time to work.”
“I’ve gotta try harder at school.”
“I’ve gotta tell my wife I’ll be late.”
“I’ve gotta learn more about the laws.”
“I’ve gotta clean my house today.”

I would like to + (verb)
This sentence lets someone know what you would be interested in doing. This can be a physical, mental or verbal action.

Here are some examples:

“I would like to answer that question.”
“I would like to compete in a cooking contest.”
“I would like to explain myself.”
“I would like to invite you over.”
“I would like to practice.”
“I would like to become a doctor.”
“I would like to see you more often.”
“I would like to thank you.”
“I would like to learn about animals.”
“I would like to meet the Presiden

I plan to + (verb)
‘Plan to’ describes something that you would like to do in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“I plan to find a new apartment.”
“I plan to relax on vacation.”
“I plan to surprise my parents.”
“I plan to wash my car.”
“I plan to adopt a child.”
“I plan to impress my boss.”
“I plan to watch a movie.”
“I plan to save more money.”
“I plan to read a book.”
“I plan to learn new things.”

I’ve decided to + (verb)
‘I’ve’ is short for ‘I have’ and including the word ‘decided’ you are stating that you have made a decision or come to a conclusion.

Here are some examples:

“I’ve decided to accept the job.”
“I’ve decided to complete my degree.”
“I’ve decided to change my bad habits.”
“I’ve decided to extend my membership at the gym.”
“I’ve decided to form a chess club.”
“I’ve decided to hand over my responsibilities.”
“I’ve decided to help you move.”
“I’ve decided to interview for the job.”
“I’ve decided to increase my work load.”
“I’ve decided to manage a store.”

I was about to + (verb)
When stating ‘I was about to’ you are informing someone that you are going to be doing something at that moment or in the very near future.

Here are some examples:

“I was about to go out.”
“I was about to go to dinner.”
“I was about to go to bed.”
“I was about to go to work.”
“I was about to say the same thing.”
“I was about to call you.”
“I was about to send you an email.”
“I was about to mow my grass.”
“I was about to order us some drinks.”
“I was about to watch television.”

I didn’t mean to + (verb)
The word ‘didn’t’ is a contraction of the words ‘did not’. When using it in a sentence with the words ‘mean to’ you are informing someone that you did something you regret or are sorry for. This could have been a physical, mental or verbal action.

Here are some examples:

“I didn’t mean to hurt your feelings.”
“I didn’t mean to call you so late.”
“I didn’t mean to lie about what happened.”
“I didn’t mean to embarrass you.”
“I didn’t mean to stay out so late.”
“I did not mean to say those things.”
“I did not mean to leave you out.”
“I did not mean to make you confused.”
“I did not mean to think you were involved.”
“I did not mean to cause trouble.”

I don’t have time to + (verb)
The word ‘don’t’ is a contraction of the words ‘do not.’ When adding ‘have time to’ you are simply stating that you have other obligations and all other things considered must wait.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t have time to explain.”
“I don’t have time to eat.”
“I don’t have time to exercise.”
“I don’t have time to watch my favorite TV show.”
“I don’t have time to talk.”

You can also use the phrase ‘I don’t’ to express things you do not like, things you do not understand, or things you do not do.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t eat meat.”
“I don’t like the rain.”
“I don’t understand Spanish.”
“I do not understand what you are saying.”
“I do not like scary movies.”
“I do not like sports.”

I promise not to + (verb)
When using the word ‘promise’ you are giving your word that what you are saying is true. You might also be assuring someone a guarantee that you will follow thru on what you are saying to them.

When using ‘promise not to’ you are stating you will not do a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“I promise not to tell.”
“I promise not to leave without you.”
“I promise not to be so late.”
“I promise not to hurt your feelings.”
“I promise not to wake you up.”

You can also just use the word ‘promise’ to assure someone of your intentions.

Here are some examples:

“I promise I am telling the truth.”
“I promise to practice my math.”
“I promise to call you.”
“I promise I will tell you.”
“I promise I will come to your party.”

I’d rather + (verb)
‘I’d’ is a contraction of the words ‘I had’ or ‘I would.’

When using it with the word ‘rather’ you are suggesting you would like to do or prefer one thing more than another.

Here are some examples:

“I’d rather talk about this later.”
“I’d like to eat at home than go get fast food.”
“I’d rather ski than snowboard.”
“I’d rather stay late than come in early tomorrow.”
“I’d rather handle the problem myself.”
“I had rather go home than stay out too late.”
“I had rather listen to my parents or get in trouble.”
“I would rather exercise than sit on the couch all day.”
“I would rather complete my task early.”
“I would rather know the answer.”

I feel like + (verb-ing)
Here you are expressing to someone something you would enjoy doing.

Here are some examples:

“I feel like going for a bike ride.”
“I feel like going to the beach.”
“I feel like having a snack.”
“I feel like talking.”
“I feel like dancing.”
“I feel like having friends over to my house.”
“I feel like watching TV.”

By adding ‘don’t’ or ‘do not’ you can change what you are saying to express something you would not enjoy or express a concern about something.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t feel like leaving yet.”
“I don’t feel like explaining.”
“I don’t feel like going to bed.”
“I do not feel comfortable talking about it.”
“I do not feel like we are going in the right direction.”

I can’t help + (verb-ing)
The word ‘can’t’ is contraction for ‘cannot.’ Combined with ‘help’ you are communicating something you are unable to control or having a hard time gaining a grasp for. This can be a physical or mental action.

Here are some examples:

“I can’t help thinking about it.”
“I can’t help shopping so much.”
“I can’t help working all the time.”
“I can’t help smiling when I see her.”
“I can’t help eating so much.”
“I can’t help loving you.”
“I can not help biting my nails when I am nervous.”
“I can not help smoking when I have been drinking.”
“I cannot help feeling so sad.”
“I cannot help remembering the things you did.”

I was busy + (verb-ing)
When using the word ‘was’, you are referring to something in a past tense, or something that happened before. Combining it with the word ‘busy’ you can express something that was occupying you in a past time.

Here are some examples:

“I was busy thinking.”
“I was busy working.”
“I was busy cooking dinner.”
“I was busy talking on the phone.”
“I was busy cleaning the house.”
“I was busy studying for my test.”
“I was busy thinking of ideas for our website.”
“I was busy entertaining our neighbors.”
“I was busy completing my housework.”
“I was busy learning new things.”

By changing ‘was’ to ‘am’ you change your message from past tense to present tense and refer to something you are doing ‘now.’

Here are some examples:

“I am busy working.”
“I am busy cooking dinner.”
“I am busy studying for my test.”
“I am busy completing housework.”
“I am busy talking on the phone.”

I’m not used to + (verb-ing)
Here you are using ‘not used to’ to inform someone that you are unfamiliar or uncomfortable with a topic at hand.

Here are some examples:

“I’m not used to talking English.”
“I’m not used to studying so much.”
“I’m not used to being around new people.”
“I’m not used to talking in front of groups of people.”
“I’m not used to having so much stress.”
“I’m not used to traveling so much.”
“I’m not used to working so early.”
“I’m not used to having so much responsibility.”
“I’m not used to drinking so much.”

I want you to + (verb)
‘I want you to’ is telling someone that you have a desire or would like for them to do something.

Here are some examples:

“I want you to clean the dishes.”
“I want you to come home right after school.”
“I want you to call once you get there.”
“I want you to explain yourself to me.”
“I want you to educate me.”

By using the word ‘need’ instead of ‘want’ you are expressing something that is required or wanted.

Here are some examples:

“I need you to study harder in school.”
“I need you to stop and listen to me.”
“I need you to greet our guests.”
“I need you to introduce me to your family.”
“I need to request a refund.”

I’m here to + (verb)
You are informing someone that you are at a particular place to accomplish something.

Here are some examples:

“I’m here to apply for the job.”
“I’m here to take a test.”
“I’m here to receive my gift.”
“I’m here to support all your decisions.”
“I’m here to watch a movie.”
“I’m here to work on your computer.”
“I’m here to welcome you to the neighborhood.”
“I’m here to raise awareness for cancer.”
“I’m here to start the job.”
“I’m here to receive the award.”

I have something + (verb)
When using the expression ‘I have something’ you are communicating that you possess something or need to do something that is unspecified or undetermined.

Here are some examples:

“I have something to complete.”
“I have something to share with you.”
“I have something important to tell you.”
“I have something to encourage you.”
“I have something to explain to you.”
“I have something special planned for your birthday.”
“I have something else to consider.”
“I have something to apologize about.”
“I have something to attend tonight.”
“I have something to ask you.”
“I have something fun for us to do.”

I’m looking forward to
When telling someone that you are ‘looking forward to’ you are saying that you are waiting or hoping for something, especially with pleasure.

Here are some examples:

“I’m looking forward to meeting you.”
“I’m looking forward to talking with you.”
“I’m looking forward to going on vacation.”
“I’m looking forward to spending time with my family.”
“I’m looking forward to learning the English language.”
“I am looking forward to visiting another country.”
“I am looking forward to having a family.”
“I am looking forward to graduating from college.”
“I am looking forward to watching the baseball game.”
“I am looking forward to running in a race.”

English Speaking Basics – Section II

English Speaking Basics II is for English speaking beginners who need help to understand the basics of speaking English. We will use very simple phrases and expressions to help you with your English speaking.

This second section contains the next 30 lessons. If any lessons are too easy, please move forward to other lessons.

I’m calling to + (verb)
When using the words ‘I’m calling’ you are stating that you are actually using the phone to call and relay information.

Here are some examples:

“I’m calling to tell you about my day.”
“I’m calling to accept your invitation.”
“I’m calling to answer your question.”
“I’m calling to book a reservation at your restaurant.”
“I’m calling to complain about something.”
“I’m calling to thank you.”
“I’m calling to support your decision.”
“I’m calling to remind you of our dinner plans.”
“I’m calling to report a lost wallet.”
“I’m calling to receive my prize.”

I’m working on + (noun)
‘I’m’ is a contraction for the words ‘I am.’ The phrase ‘working on’ relays a physical or mental effort towards an accomplishment.

Here are some examples:

“I’m working on a big project.”
“I’m working on training my dog.”
“I’m working on making new friends.”
“I’m working on educating myself.”
“I’m working on my homework.”
“I am working on painting a house.”
“I am working on a new idea.”
“I am working on my computer.”
“I’m working on my website.”

I’m sorry to + (verb)
Saying you are ‘sorry to’ expresses a feeling of sympathy or regret.

Here are some examples:

“I’m sorry to be so late.”
“I’m sorry to hear about your sick mother.”
“I’m sorry to waste your time.”
“I’m sorry to make you feel so sad.”
“I’m sorry to frighten you.”
“I’m sorry to disagree with your decision.”
“I’m sorry to call so late.”
“I’m sorry to admit what I did.”
“I’m sorry to end this relationship.”

I’m thinking of + (verb-ing)
‘Thinking’ refers to a process of thought, forming an opinion or judgment. When expressing ‘I am thinking of’ you are letting someone know what you are personally thinking.

Here are some examples:

“I’m thinking of checking out the new movie.”
“I’m thinking of filming my vacation.”
“I’m thinking of following a healthy diet.”
“I’m thinking of handing out flyers describing our business.”
“I’m thinking of increasing my work load.”
“I am thinking of introducing myself to him.”
“I am thinking of launching a new website.”
“I am thinking of moving to a new city.”
“I am thinking of offering her the position.”
“I am thinking of opening up a store.”

I’ll help you + (verb)
This lets you inform someone that you are willing to provide assistance. This could refer to something physical or mental, like helping someone to ‘think’ or ‘remember’ something.

Here are some examples:

“I’ll help you cook dinner tonight.”
“I’ll help you raise money for your charity.”
“I’ll help you register for your class online.”
“I’ll help you move to your new house.”
“I’ll help you prevent that from happening again.”
“I will help you park your car.”
“I will help you provide all the information you need.”
“I will help you realize your potential.”
“I will help you stop smoking.”
“I will help you shop for groceries.”

I’m dying to + (verb)
When using the word ‘dying’ in this manner you are referring to wanting or desiring something greatly.

Here are some examples:

“I’m dying to relax on the beach.”
“I’m dying to pick some fresh fruit.”
“I’m dying to order some desserts.”
“I’m dying to find out if I got the job.”
“I’m dying to move to a bigger house.”
“I’m dying to look at all the work you’ve done.”
“I’m dying to learn more about you.”
“I’m dying to introduce you to my parents.”
“I’m dying to expand my business.”
“I’m dying to check my score on the test.”

It’s my turn to + (verb)
The word ‘It’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘it is.’ When stating ‘my turn’ you are telling someone that it is time to change position or position focuses on to you.

Here are some examples:

“It’s my turn to walk you home.”
“It’s my turn to do laundry.”
“It’s my turn to work late.”
“It’s my turn to take out the trash.”
“It’s my turn to choose where we eat.”
“It is my turn to pay for dinner.”
“It is my turn to roll the dice.”
“It is my turn to provide an answer.”
“It is my turn to try and play the game.”
“It is my turn to attempt solving the problem.”

It’s hard for me to + (verb)
When saying that something is ‘hard for me’ you are informing someone that what you are talking about is difficult or challenging for you.

Here are some examples:

“It’s hard for me to accept what you are telling me.”
“It’s hard for me to argue your point.”
“It’s hard for me to balance my check book.”
“It’s hard for me to concentrate on the task.”
“It’s hard for me to consider your other options.”
“It’s hard for me to depend on you.”
“It is hard for me to decide where to go tonight.”
“It is hard for me to explain my actions.”
“It is hard for me to guarantee your success.”
“It is hard for me to handle so much pressure.”

I’m having a hard time + (verb-ing)
By stating you are having a hard time you are letting someone know you are having difficulty with something. This could be something physical or mental and something that could be overcome with effort.

Here are some examples:

“I’m having a hard time writing.”
“I’m having a hard time understanding you.”
“I’m having a hard time answering your question.”
“I’m having a hard time downloading songs to my iPod.”
“I’m having a hard time agreeing to the terms.”

With the addition of a verb you can express in more detail just how difficult something is for you.

Here are some examples:

“I’m having an extremely hard time trusting you.”
“I’m having an extremely hard time with my wife.”
“I’m having a very hard time finding a job.”
“I’m having a very hard time finding parts for my car.”

I think I should + (verb)
Here you are telling someone that you feel strongly about doing a particular action. Here are some examples:

“I think I should practice my reading.”
“I think I should join a study group.”
“I think I should handle this as soon as possible.”
“I think I should earn my degree.”
“I think I should explain myself.”

By adding the word ‘don’t’ you have changed what you are conveying from something you are thinking of doing, to something you are against.

Here are some examples:

“I do not think I should complain so much.”
“I do not think I should attend that event.”
“I do not think I should borrow more money.”
“I do not think I should doubt you.”
“I do not think I should decide until later.”

I’ve heard that + (subject + verb)
You are letting someone know that you are aware of something or that you have been informed of something that is taking place. This could be something that has already happened or something happening in the near future. ‘I’ve’ is a contraction of the words ‘I have.’

Here are some examples:

“I’ve heard that you got a new job.”
“I’ve heard that you want to leave your job.”
“I’ve heard that you got a new car.”
“I’ve heard that you like to jog.”
“I’ve heard that you fix computers.”
“I’ve heard that you’ve never been to Canada.”
“I’ve heard that you like to shop.”
“I’ve heard that you and your boss don’t get along.”
“I’ve heard that there is no school next week.”
“I’ve heard that your wife is a yoga instructor.”

It occurred to me that (subject + verb)
The word ‘occurred’ informs someone that something has come to mind or has been found. You are letting someone know that you suddenly have thought or remembered about something.

Here are some examples:

“It occurred to me that I forgot your birthday.”
“It occurred to me that we both belong to the same gym.”
“It occurred to me that we enjoy a lot of the same things.”
“It occurred to me the price for homes are more expensive here.”
“It occurred to me that eating healthy makes me feel better.”

Using the word ‘had’ or ‘has’ can change what you are saying to represent something remembered in a past time.

Here are some examples:

“It had occurred to me that I forgot something at the grocery.”
“It had occurred to me I might need to change my email address.”
“It has occurred to me I forgot my mom’s birthday.”
“It has occurred to me before.”

Let me + (verb)
‘Let me’ is suggesting that you are asking for permission or an opportunity to do something.

Here are some examples:

“Let me make my own decisions.”
“Let me offer to help you.”
“Let me open the door for you.”
“Let me pause and think about what we are doing.”
“Let me welcome you to the neighborhood.”
“Let me save you the trouble.”
“Let me make a suggestion.”
“Let me try and fix your car.”
“Let me taste the soup before you add more spices.”
“Let me treat you to some ice cream.”

Thank you for
Saying ‘thank you’ is telling someone you appreciate what they have done. This can either be something they did for you or for someone else.

Here are some examples:

“Thank you for inviting me.”
“Thank you for helping me move.”
“Thank you for informing me about the job opening.”
“Thank you for mailing that package for me.”
“Thank you for working so hard.”
“Thank you for stopping by to visit.”
“Thank you for replying to my email.”
“Thank you for providing me with the answers.”
“Thank you for heating up dinner.”
“Thank you for hurrying to get here.”

Can I + (verb)
When ending a sentence with a question mark (?) you are asking the person or people you are talking to a question for which you would like an answer. Here you are asking permission to do a particular action.

Here are some examples:

“Can I answer your question?”
“Can I attend the event?”
“Can I move to another spot?”
“Can I call you tomorrow?”
“Can I complete this later?”
“Can I explain myself?”
“Can I help you with your homework?”
“Can I include you in our plans?”
“Can I introduce you to my co-workers?”
“Can I inform you of some bad news?”

Can I get + (noun)
The phrase ‘Can I get’ can be used in a couple different ways. You can use it to ask a question.

Here are some examples:

“Can I get a cup of water?”
“Can I get a dog?”
“Can I get lunch?”
“Can I get sugar in my coffee?”
“Can I get popcorn at the movie?”

You can also use it when offering to help someone or do something for them.

Here are some examples:

“Can I get you another drink?”
“Can I help you move that?”
“Can I recommend a good place to eat?”
“Can I take you home?”
“Can I help you finish your project?”

I’m not sure if (subject + verb)
‘I’m not sure’ expresses a feeling of uncertainty or lack of confidence on a particular matter.

Here are some examples:

“I am not sure if they will offer me the job.”
“I’m not sure if she’ll return my call.”
“I’m not sure if my wife will understand.”
“I’m not sure if we will go out tonight.”
“I’m not sure if I understand your question.”
“I am not sure if I can handle it.”
“I am not sure if it will happen.”
“I am not sure if it will matter.”
“I am not sure if my mom will notice.”
“I am not sure if they will permit us to park there.”

Do you mind if I + (verb)
You are asking someone in present tense if they object to something you are asking.

Here are some examples:

“Do you mind if I excuse myself?”
“Do you mind if we left early?”
“Do you mind if I take a nap?”
“Do you mind if I ask your mom?”
“Do you mind if it snows?”

You could also use the word ‘would’

Here are some examples:

“Would you mind if we went out to eat?”
“Would you mind if I opened the window?”
“Would you mind telling me what you’re doing?”
“Would you mind being quiet for a minute?”
“Would you mind if I changed the channel?”

I don’t know what to + (verb)
You are letting someone know that you are not sure about what is being asked. You may also have no knowledge or opinion on a topic.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t know what to eat for dinner.”
“I don’t know what to buy you for your birthday.”
“I don’t know what to say.”
“I don’t know what to do with my spare time.”
“I don’t know what to do for vacation.”
“I do not know what to do to make you happy.”
“I do not know what to do to help you understand.”
“I do not know what to think.”
“I do not know what to do to prevent this.”
“I do not know what to order.”

I should have + (past participle)
‘Should’ is the past tense of the word ‘shall.’ When using the words ‘should have’ you are talking about something in the past that you ‘ought to’ or ‘might have’ done.

Here are some examples:

“I should have gone with you.”
“I should have studied more for my test.”
“I should have read the directions before starting.”
“I should have eaten breakfast this morning.”
“I should have listened to your advice.”
“I should have married her when I had the chance.”

‘Shall’ is something that will take place or exist in the future.

Here are some examples:

“I shall leave tomorrow.”
“I shall finish the job next week.”
“I shall see it tomorrow.”
“I shall go outside if it’s nice out.”
“I shall pay for this later.”

I wish I could + (verb)
You are expressing a desire to do something.

Here are some examples:

“I wish I could sing better.”
“I wish I could settle the argument.”
“I wish I could sail around the world.”
“I wish I could remain calm during all of this.”
“I wish I could remember his name.”
“I wish I could replace my old car with a new one.”
“I wish I could play outside.”
“I wish I could go to the game with you.”
“I wish I could write better.”
“I wish I could own my own business.”

You should + (verb)
Here you are suggesting an obligation or duty that needs to take place either now or in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“You should go to bed.”
“You should do your homework before going outside.”
“You should replace you headlights on your car.”
“You should request a raise at work.”
“You should stop smoking.”
“You should smile more.”
“You should slow down when driving in a neighborhood.”
“You should talk to him about it.”
“You should train your dog.”
“You should trust what they say.”

You’re supposed to + (verb)
‘You’re’ is a contraction of the words ‘you are.’ When using ‘You’re’ with the words ‘supposed to’ you are making a suggestion that something you strongly believe ought to happen.

Here are some examples:

“You’re supposed to keep that secret.”
“You’re supposed to let me know when you leave.”
“You’re supposed to stop when at a red light.”
“You’re supposed to unpack once you get there.”
“You’re supposed to return the movies you rent on time.”
“You are supposed to remain calm.”
“You are supposed to fasten your seat belt.”
“You are supposed to invite all your friends.”
“You are supposed to encourage one another.”
“You are supposed to decide before next Thursday.”

You seem + (adjective)
When stating ‘you seem’ you’re referring to the person you are talking to and expressing that they are giving the impression of or appear to be.

Here are some examples:

“You seem bored.”
“You seem unhappy with the results.”
“You seem eager to begin.”
“You seem easy to get along with.”
“You seem elated to hear the good news.”
“You seem deeply in love.”
“You seem afraid of roller coasters.”
“You seem confused about the rules of the game.”
“You seem embarrassed about what happened.”
“You seem decisive about your choice.”

You’d better + (verb)
‘You’d’ is a contraction of ‘you had’ or ‘you would.’ You are making a suggestion to someone for a particular action.

Here are some examples:

“You’d better exercise.”
“You’d better help out.”
“You’d better invite your brother.”
“You’d better impress the judges.”
“You’d better listen to your parents.”
“You had better not come home late.”
“You had better hope for the best.”
“You had better change your attitude.”
“You would be good at teaching.”
“You would do well at math.”

Are you into + (noun)
Here you are asking a question about an interest they might have or something they might enjoy doing.

Here are some examples:

“Are you into soccer?”
“Are you into trying new things?”
“Are you into wine tasting?”
“Are you into working out at home or at the gym?”
“Are you into scary movies?”
“Are you into playing games?”
“Are you into jogging?”
“Are you into painting?”
“Are you into traveling?”
“Are you into fixing cars?”

Are you trying to + (verb)
You are asking someone if they are attempting to do something. This can be something mentally or physically.

Here are some examples:

“Are you trying to ignore me?”
“Are you trying to manage your money?”
“Are you trying to memorize that song?”
“Are you trying to offer your help?”
“Are you trying to program your new phone?”
“Are you trying to pretend like it never happened?”
“Are you trying to remain calm?”
“Are you trying to remember her name?”
“Are you trying to reflect on the past?”
“Are you trying to switch flights?”

Please + (verb)
‘Please’ is generally used in a polite request when asking someone to do something.

Here are some examples:

“Please pass me the salt.”
“Please order me the steak and potatoes.”
“Please stop bothering me.”
“Please wash your hands before dinner.”
“Please wait outside until we are ready.”
“Please zip up your coat before you go outside.”
“Please stand back.”

The word ‘please’ can also mean to give enjoyment or satisfaction to.

Here are some examples:

“The smell of the flowers was very pleasing.”
“May it please the court to admit this into evidence?”
“I was very pleased with how the children behaved in class.”
“You cannot please everyone all the time.”
“She was pleased with the dress.”

Don’t + (verb)
The word ‘don’t’ is a contraction of the words ‘do not.’ It is said to convey a message of what NOT should be done.

Here are some examples:

“Don’t try and fool me.”
“Don’t allow this to happen.”
“Don’t watch scary movies before you go to bed.”
“Don’t cause any more trouble.”
“Don’t chew gum in class.”
“Do not concern yourself with other people’s problems.”
“Do not behave that way.”
“Do not announce your decision until you’re ready.”
“Do not argue with me.”
“Do not arrive late for your meeting.

Do you like
With this question you are asking someone what they prefer or enjoy.

Here are some examples:

“Do you like traveling on a plane?”
“Do you like watching baseball on TV?”
“Do you like skiing or snowboarding?”
“Do you like going to bed early?”
“Do you like spending time with me?”
“Do you like repeating the class?”
“Do you like playing video games?”
“Do you like listening to music?”
“Do you like practicing playing the piano?”
“Do you like jogging with me?”

How often do you
When asking this question you are inquiring how often or how frequent someone does a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“How often do you exercise?”
“How often do you change your password?”
“How often do you help out at school?”
“How often do you listen to your MP3 player?”
“How often do you need to go to the dentist?”
“How often do you receive your magazine in the mail?”
“How often do you report to your supervisor?”
“How often do you stretch before working out?”
“How often do you talk to your parents?”
“How often do you travel?”

Do you want me to + (verb)
To ‘want’ is to feel or have a desire for. When saying ‘Do you want me to’ you’re asking someone if there is anything you can do for them or assist them with.

Here are some examples:

“Do you want me to pick up the kids?”
“Do you want me to fix your flat tire?”
“Do you want me to help you read that book?”
“Do you want me to remind you?”
“Do you want me to remove my shoes?”

The word ‘want’ can also be used to express something YOU would like someone else to do or that something you personally would enjoy.

Here are some examples:

“I want you to come over.”
“I want you to make a decision.”
“I want you to water the flowers.”
“I want to understand what you are trying to say.”
“I want to be better at swimming.”
“I want to be more involved at church.”

What do you think about (verb-ing)
This question asks someone their opinion about a topic.

Here are some examples:

“What do you think about having a cup of tea with me?”
“What do you think about working overtime next week?”
“What do you think about waiting in line for tickets?”
“What do you think about sailing?”
“What do you think about staying here another night?”
“What do you think about retiring from your job?”
“What do you think about planting new trees in the backyard?”
“What do you think about offering to babysit?”
“What do you think about living in a new city?”
“What do you think about filming our vacation?”

Why don’t we + (verb)
‘Don’t’ is a contraction of ‘do not.’ When using ‘why’ you are asking a question that involves yourself and the person you are talking to.

Here are some examples:

“Why don’t we go bowling tonight?”
“Why don’t we pick some fresh flowers?”
“Why don’t we play a game of chess?”
“Why don’t we save more money?”
“Why don’t we remember this place?”
“Why don’t we test this before using it?”
“Why don’t we try and do it again?”
“Why don’t we post our results online?”
“Why don’t we gather more firewood?”
“Why don’t we earn more money?”

It’s too bad that
‘Too bad’ means regrettable or unfortunate. When using it in a sentence you are expressing a concern or regret for what has taken place. The topic being discussed could have happened to you, the person you are talking to, or someone or something else.

Here are some examples:

“It’s too bad that she lost her job.”
“It’s too bad that you have to go.”
“It’s too bad that I found out about it.”
“It’s too bad we will not be there on time.”
“It’s too bad that tickets are all gone to that concert.”
“It’s too bad that it is supposed to rain.”
“It’s too bad that she got hurt.”
“It’s too bad that my work has to lay off people.”
“It’s too bad that you do not understand.”

You could have + (past participle)
Using ‘could have’ you are speaking about something that was, should be or would be. You are stating that they had other options that could have been chosen.

Here are some examples:

“You could have completed it sooner.”
“You could have blown your chance.”
“You could have done better on your exam.”
“You could have given me more time to get ready.”
“You could have heard that from someone else.”
“You could have sent that package first class.”
“You could have slept in a little longer.”
“You could have written him a letter.”
“You could have thought of something to do.”
“You could have upset her by saying that.” If I were you, I would + (verb)
Here you are giving an example of what decision YOU would do given the circumstances. This can be in past tense or in a conditional present.

Here are some examples:

“If I were you, I would enjoy my vacation.”
“If I were you, I would explain what happened.”
“If I were you, I would continue working until it is done.”
“If I were you, I would book my reservations now.”
“If I were you, I would answer the question.”

By adding ‘have’ after the word ‘would’ you are talking about something in the past tense.

Here are some examples:

“If I were you, I would have enjoyed my vacation.”
“If I were you, I would have explained what happened.”
“If I were you, I would have continued working until it was done.”
“If I were you, I would have booked my reservations now.”
“If I were you, I would have answered the question.”

It’s gonna be + (adjective)
You’re informing someone what something is going to be like. This could be something you are going to do, see or feel.

Here are some examples:

“It’s going to be delicious.”
“It’s gonna be easy.”
“It’s gonna be depressing.”
“It’s going to be exciting.”
“It’s going to be disgusting.”

You can also add ‘he or she’ or a person’s name to describe how they might react to something.

Here are some examples:

“He is going to be tough to deal with.”
“He is going to be terrific at that.”
“She is going to be relieved to hear that.”
“She is going to be scared after watching that movie.”
“Sally is going to be successful.”

It looks like + (noun)
You could be describing how something is similar or appears to be by the way it looks.

Here are some examples:

“It looks like a balloon.”
“It looks like a jellyfish.”
“It looks like a banana.”
“It looks like a fish.”
You can also use ‘it looks like’ to describe something that might be in the future.

Here are some examples:

“It looks like it’s going to rain.”
“It looks like it’s going to be fun.”
“It looks like it’s going to be a long day.”

You can also use it to describe something in the present tense.

Here are some examples:

“It looks like they are leaving.”
“It looks like he is waving to us.”
“It looks like she is lost.”
“It looks like they are racing.”
That’s why + (subject + verb)
‘That’s’ is short for ‘that is.’ Here you are telling someone ‘because of this’ or ‘therefore.’

Here are some examples:

“That’s why people admire you.”
“That’s why she appears so happy.”
“That’s why babies crawl before they can walk.”
“That’s why Pam cries at sad movies.”
“That’s why you fail to understand.”
“That is why you help out people in need.”
“That is why you try and include everyone.”
“That is why you lock your doors when you leave home.”
“That is why she smiles when you walk by.”
“That is why you use it for emergencies.”

It’s time to + (verb)
You are letting someone know that something is required to be done at the present time.

Here are some examples:

“It’s time to say goodbye.”
“It’s time to ask for a raise.”
“It’s time to collect our money.”
“It’s time to cheer for our team.”
“It’s time to change the clocks.”
“It is time to decide what to do.”
“It is time to enjoy ourselves.”
“It is time to fill me in on what’s going on.”
“It is time to help out.”
“It is time to join a gym.”

The point is that + (subject + verb)
By stating ‘the point is’ you are stating in your opinion the meaning about what is actually happening.

Here are some examples:

“The point is that if you study you will do well in school.”
“The point is that she does not understand.”
“The point is that we need this done today.”
“The point is that the world would be a better place.”
“The point is that we should help.”
“The point is that snakes can be dangerous.”
“The point is that leaving a baby alone is not a good idea.”
“The point is that if we do not leave now we will be late.”
“The point is that she needs to be more responsible.”
“The point is that we need to work together.”

How was + (noun)
By using the words ‘how was’ you are asking someone a question about something that happened or something they did in the past.

Here are some examples:

“How was your meeting?”
“How was your doctor’s appointment?”
“How was the birthday party?”
“How was lunch?”
“How was the airplane ride?”
“How was vacation?”
“How were your parents?”
“How were roads when you drove home?”
“How were people acting after what happened?”
“How were holidays with the family?”

How about + (verb-ing)
You’re asking someone their opinion on something or if they would like to do something.

Here are some examples:

“How about singing?”
“How about hanging out tonight?”
“How about folding the laundry for me?”
“How about helping us out?”
“How about describing to me what happened?”
“How about exploring new ideas?”
“How about comparing prices before we buy it?”
“How about considering it?”
“How about following me to their house?”
“How about feeding the dogs?”

What if + (subject + verb)
Here you are asking a question about ‘in the event of’ or ‘in the event that.’ Usually you are looking for an answer at the time of the question that is being asked.

Here are some examples:

“What if I miss the bus?”
“What if I were late to dinner?”
“What if I called her tomorrow?”
“What if I don’t understand?”
“What if someone sees me?”
“What if no one is home?”
“What if they decide to stay?”
“What if it rains while we are camping?”
“What if I do not finish on time?”
“What if we introduce ourselves first?”

How much does it cost to + (verb)
You are simply asking how much you would need to pay to do something.

Here are some examples:

“How much does it cost to fly to Europe?”
“How much does it cost to own a house?”
“How much does it cost to play a round of golf?”
“How much does it cost to join a gym?”
“How much does it cost to repair my car?”
“How much would it cost to talk long distance?”
“How much would it cost to run a website?”
“How much would it cost to wash my car?”
“How much would it cost to rent a car?”
“How much would it cost to go to the movies?”

How come + (subject + verb)
When using ‘how come’ you are asking why a particular thing has or had to take place.

Here are some examples:

“How come parents worry so much?”
“How come people carpool to work?”
“How come you are so upset?”
“How come he will not call you?”
“How come you stayed out so late?”
“How come you cannot make a decision?”
“How come you always question me?”
“How come we never agree?”
“How come your dog digs in the yard?”
“How come she will not come over?”

What are the chances of + (verb-ing)
By asking ‘what are the chances of’ you are wondering how often or in what case would a particular thing happen.

Here are some examples:

“What are the chances of getting tickets?”
“What are the chances of that happening?”
“What are the chances of it raining today?”
“What are the chances of winning the lottery?”

When replacing the word ‘the’ with ‘your’ or ‘our’ you can ask what the chances ‘personally’ that the topic will happen.

Here are some examples:

“What are the chances of you staying home today?”
“What are your chances of getting the job?”
“What are your chances of improving?”
“What are your chances of moving?”
“What are our chances of staying together?”
“What are our chances of working together?”
“What are our chances of going together?”

There is something wrong with + (noun)
You are informing someone that there is something not right or out of the ordinary.

Here are some examples:

“There is something wrong with my laptop.”
“There is something wrong with my car.”
“There is something wrong with my cell phone.”
“There is something wrong with my head.”
“There is something wrong with your answering machine.”
“There is something wrong with your way of thinking.”
“There is something wrong with your attitude.”
“There is something wrong with your dog.”
“There is something wrong with our relationship.”
“There is something wrong with our alarm clock.”

Let’s not + (verb)
The word ‘let’s’ is formed from the words ‘let us.’ Here you are requesting that something not take place at this moment or that what is happening needs to be contained or lessened.

Here are some examples:

“Let’s not discuss this now.”
“Let’s not stay here too long.”
“Let’s not stop anywhere on the way.”
“Let’s not remain mad at each other.”
“Let’s not meddle in other people’s business.”
“Let us not get too excited.”
“Let us not worry too much.”
“Let us not interrupt them when they are talking.”
“Let us help you.”
“Let us get that for you.”

Let’s say that + (subject + verb)
‘Let’s’ is a contraction for ‘let us.’ You are suggesting to someone that you should both agree on what you will communicate to someone else.

Here are some examples:

“Let’s say that you love to fish.”
“Let’s say we found it.”
“Let’s say that we enjoy being with them.”
“Let’s say that we had a good time.”
“Let’s say that it’s hard to decide.”
“Let’s say that we have to go.”
“Let’s say that we can host.”
“Let’s say that I have to work.”
“Let’s say that the movie was really good.”

There’s no need to + (verb)
The word ‘there’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘there is’ or ‘there has.’ When expressing ‘no need’ you are stating that the action does not need to take place.

Here are some examples:

“There’s no need to worry.”
“There’s no need to be upset.”
“There’s no need to act so strange.”
“There’s no need to act so shy.”
“There’s no need to rush off.”
“There’s no need to talk now.”
“There is no need to call this late.”
“There is no need to bother him.”
“There is no need to run away.”
“There is no need to stop now.”

It takes + (time) + to + (verb)
You are letting someone know how long it will take to do a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“It takes one hour to get there.”
“It takes forty-five minutes for me to get ready.”
“It takes four quarters to complete a football game.”
“It takes 7 seconds for my car to go 60 miles per hour.”
“It takes all day for us to finish golfing.”
“It takes years to learn to play guitar.”
“It takes 15 minutes to get to downtown.”
“It takes me one hour to cook.”

Please make sure that + (subject + verb)
You are asking someone to make sure that a particular thing happens or takes place.

Here are some examples:

“Please make sure that she wakes up on time.”
“Please make sure that she gets to school.”
“Please make sure that dinner is ready when we get home.”
“Please make sure that your assignment is done.”
“Please make sure that the water is not too hot.”
“Please make sure you cook the meat long enough.”
“Please make sure that she is getting along with her new friends.”
“Please make sure that we leave on time.”
“Please make sure you record our favorite TV show.”
“Please make sure that you don’t stay out too late.”

Here’s to + (noun)
‘Here’s to’ is used in a way of celebrating or identifying a person, place, or thing of significance. It is usually said while toasting someone at dinner, or signaling to someone or something after an event.

Here are some examples:

“Here’s to the winner!”
“Here’s to your marriage!”
“Here’s to the New Year!”
“Here’s to great friends!”
“Here’s to starting a new job!”
“Here is to the luckiest guy in the world!”
“Here is to you!”
“Here is to happiness!”
“Here is to a wonderful day!”
“Here is to great memories!”

It’s no use + (verb-ing)
‘It’s’ is a contraction for ‘it is.’ By stating ‘it’s no use’ you are saying that what you or someone else is doing is not recommended or uncalled for.

Here are some examples:

“It’s no use crying.”
“It’s no use separating them.”
“It’s no use talking to her.”
“It’s no use whining about it.”
“It’s no use apologizing.”
“It’s no use attempting to please him.”
“It’s no use arguing about it.”
“It’s no use behaving that way.”
“It’s no use cleaning up.”
“It’s no use checking on it yet.”

There’s no way + (subject + verb)
‘There’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘there is.’ By stating ‘there’s no way’ you are relaying a thought of doubt about an event taking place now or in the future.

Here are some examples:

“There’s no way you finish on time.”
“There’s no way we complete on time.”
“There’s no way your mother approves.”
“There’s no way no one claims it.”
“There’s no way they expect it.”
“There’s no way he can fix it.”
“There’s no way he can handle the news.”
“There’s no way your brother injured his ankle.”
“There is no way that horse jumps it.”
“There is no way he missed it.”
It takes + (time) + to + (verb)
You are letting someone know how long it will take to do a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“It takes one hour to get there.”
“It takes forty-five minutes for me to get ready.”
“It takes four quarters to complete a football game.”
“It takes 7 seconds for my car to go 60 miles per hour.”
“It takes all day for us to finish golfing.”
“It takes years to learn to play guitar.”
“It takes 15 minutes to get to downtown.”
“It takes me one hour to cook.”

Please make sure that + (subject + verb)
You are asking someone to make sure that a particular thing happens or takes place.

Here are some examples:

“Please make sure that she wakes up on time.”
“Please make sure that she gets to school.”
“Please make sure that dinner is ready when we get home.”
“Please make sure that your assignment is done.”
“Please make sure that the water is not too hot.”
“Please make sure you cook the meat long enough.”
“Please make sure that she is getting along with her new friends.”
“Please make sure that we leave on time.”
“Please make sure you record our favorite TV show.”
“Please make sure that you don’t stay out too late.”

Here’s to + (noun)
‘Here’s to’ is used in a way of celebrating or identifying a person, place, or thing of significance. It is usually said while toasting someone at dinner, or signaling to someone or something after an event.

Here are some examples:

“Here’s to the winner!”
“Here’s to your marriage!”
“Here’s to the New Year!”
“Here’s to great friends!”
“Here’s to starting a new job!”
“Here is to the luckiest guy in the world!”
“Here is to you!”
“Here is to happiness!”
“Here is to a wonderful day!”
“Here is to great memories!”

It’s no use + (verb-ing)
‘It’s’ is a contraction for ‘it is.’ By stating ‘it’s no use’ you are saying that what you or someone else is doing is not recommended or uncalled for.

Here are some examples:

“It’s no use crying.”
“It’s no use separating them.”
“It’s no use talking to her.”
“It’s no use whining about it.”
“It’s no use apologizing.”
“It’s no use attempting to please him.”
“It’s no use arguing about it.”
“It’s no use behaving that way.”
“It’s no use cleaning up.”
“It’s no use checking on it yet.”

There’s no way + (subject + verb)
‘There’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘there is.’ By stating ‘there’s no way’ you are relaying a thought of doubt about an event taking place now or in the future.

Here are some examples:

“There’s no way you finish on time.”
“There’s no way we complete on time.”
“There’s no way your mother approves.”
“There’s no way no one claims it.”
“There’s no way they expect it.”
“There’s no way he can fix it.”
“There’s no way he can handle the news.”
“There’s no way your brother injured his ankle.”
“There is no way that horse jumps it.”
“There is no way he missed it.”

It’s very kind of you to + (verb)
When saying it is ‘kind of you’ you are saying that what someone has done or said was very appreciated or welcomed.

Here are some examples:

“It’s very kind of you to offer me the job.”
“It’s very kind of you to listen to me.”
“It’s very kind of you to join me.”
“It’s very kind of you to invite us.”
“It’s very kind of you to inform us what happened.”
“It is kind of you to help us.”
“It is kind of you to fill me in.”
“It is kind of you to entertain us.”
“It is kind of you to double my salary.”
“It is kind of you to decorate for the party.”

There’s nothing + (subject) + can + (verb)
‘There’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘there is.’ When using the word ‘nothing’ you are suggesting that something cannot happen or be done.

Here are some examples:

“There’s nothing you can harm.”
“There’s nothing the police can identify.”
“There’s nothing we can agree on.”
“There’s nothing we can join.”
“There’s nothing she can cook.”
“There’s nothing my dog can learn.”

By using the word ‘can’ or ‘can’t’ you change the expression to mean that all is possible.

Here are some examples:

“There is nothing I cannot ask for.”
“There’s nothing we cannot accomplish.”
“There’s nothing our dog cannot open.”
“There’s nothing that truck cannot move

Rumor has it that + (subject + verb)
‘Rumor has it’ is an expression used when suggesting you might have heard something or read about something that is taking place now or in the future. A rumor is not a fact.

Here are some examples:

“Rumor has it that that player will get traded.”
“Rumor has it that she cheated on him.”
“Rumor has it that they are going to get married.”
“Rumor has it that you like to paint.”
“Rumor has it that show is going to end.”
“Rumor has it that he is going to get a raise.”
“Rumor has it that your sister got in trouble.”
“Rumor has it that she goes to our gym.”
“Rumor has it that he will not return.”
“Rumor has it that it happened while texting.”

5 Speaking Rules you need to know(In brief)
1. Don’t study grammar too much
This rule might sound strange to many ESL students, but it is one of the most important rules. If you want to pass examinations, then study grammar. However, if you want to become fluent in English, then you should try to learn English without studying the grammar.

Studying grammar will only slow you down and confuse you. You will think about the rules when creating sentences instead of naturally saying a sentence like a native. Remember that only a small fraction of English speakers know more than 20% of all the grammar rules. Many ESL students know more grammar than native speakers. I can confidently say this with experience. I am a native English speaker, majored in English Literature, and have been teaching English for more than 10 years. However, many of my students know more details about English grammar than I do. I can easily look up the definition and apply it, but I don’t know it off the top of my head.

I often ask my native English friends some grammar questions, and only a few of them know the correct answer. However, they are fluent in English and can read, speak, listen, and communicate effectively.

Do you want to be able to recite the definition of a causative verb, or do you want to be able to speak English fluently?

2. Learn and study phrases
Many students learn vocabulary and try to put many words together to create a proper sentence. It amazes me how many words some of my students know, but they cannot create a proper sentence. The reason is because they didn’t study phrases. When children learn a language, they learn both words and phrases together. Likewise, you need to study and learn phrases.

If you know 1000 words, you might not be able to say one correct sentence. But if you know 1 phrase, you can make hundreds of correct sentences. If you know 100 phrases, you will be surprised at how many correct sentences you will be able to say. Finally, when you know only a 1000 phrases, you will be almost a fluent English speaker.

Don’t translate

When you want to create an English sentence, do not translate the words from your Mother tongue. The order of words is probably completely different and you will be both slow and incorrect by doing this. Instead, learn phrases and sentences so you don’t have to think about the words you are saying. It should be automatic.

Another problem with translating is that you will be trying to incorporate grammar rules that you have learned. Translating and thinking about the grammar to create English sentences is incorrect and should be avoided.
3. Reading and Listening is NOT enough. Practice Speaking what you hear!
Reading, listening, and speaking are the most important aspects of any language. The same is true for English. However, speaking is the only requirement to be fluent. It is normal for babies and children to learn speaking first, become fluent, then start reading, then writing. So the natural order is listening, speaking, reading, then writing.

First Problem
Isn’t it strange that schools across the world teach reading first, then writing, then listening, and finally speaking? Although it is different, the main reason is because when you learn a second language, you need to read material to understand and learn it. So even though the natural order is listening, speaking, reading, then writing, the order for ESL students is reading, listening, speaking, then writing.

Second Problem
The reason many people can read and listen is because that’s all they practice. But in order to speak English fluently, you need to practice speaking. Don’t stop at the listening portion, and when you study, don’t just listen. Speak out loud the material you are listening to and practice what you hear. Practice speaking out loud until your mouth and brain can do it without any effort. By doing so, you will be able to speak English fluently.
4. Submerge yourself
Being able to speak a language is not related to how smart you are. Anyone can learn how to speak any language. This is a proven fact by everyone in the world. Everyone can speak at least one language. Whether you are intelligent, or lacking some brain power, you are able to speak one language.

This was achieved by being around that language at all times. In your country, you hear and speak your language constantly. You will notice that many people who are good English speakers are the ones who studied in an English speaking school. They can speak English not because they went to an English speaking school, but because they had an environment where they can be around English speaking people constantly.

There are also some people who study abroad and learn very little. That is because they went to an English speaking school, but found friends from their own country and didn’t practice English.

You don’t have to go anywhere to become a fluent English speaker. You only need to surround yourself with English. You can do this by making rules with your existing friends that you will only speak English. You can also carry around an iPod and constantly listen to English sentences. As you can see, you can achieve results by changing what your surroundings are. Submerge yourself in English and you will learn several times faster.

5. Study correct material
A common phrase that is incorrect is, “Practice makes perfect.” This is far from the truth. Practice only makes what you are practicing permanent. If you practice the incorrect sentence, you will have perfected saying the sentence incorrectly. Therefore, it is important that you study material that is commonly used by most people.

Another problem I see is that many students study the news. However, the language they speak is more formal and the content they use is more political and not used in regular life. It is important to understand what they are saying, but this is more of an advanced lesson that should be studied after learning the fundamental basics of English.

Studying English with a friend who is not a native English speaker is both good and bad. You should be aware of the pros and cons of speaking with a non native speaking friend. Practicing with a non native person will give you practice. You can also motivate each other and point out basic mistakes. But you might pick up bad habits from one another if you are not sure about what are correct and incorrect sentences. So use these practice times as a time period to practice the correct material you studied. Not to learn how to say a sentence.

In short, study English material that you can trust, that is commonly used, and that is correct.

English Speaking Basics – Section I

English Speaking Basics is for English speaking beginners who need help to understand the basics of speaking English. We will use very simple phrases and expressions to help you with your English speaking.
I’m
‘I’m’ is an abbreviation for the word ‘I AM.’ It is used in combination with other words to tell someone about yourself or to describe something you are doing.

Here are some examples:

“I’m so tired.”
“I’m confused.”
“I’m happy.”
“I’m twenty three years old.”
“I’m hungry.”
“I’m nervous.”
“I’m excited.”
“I’m leaving work.”
“I’m thirsty.”
“I’m from Seattle.”

You can also add descriptive words with ‘I’m’ such as:

“I’m extremely tired.”
“I’m very happy.”
“I’m terribly hungry.”
“I am super excited.”
“I’m very nervous.”

I’m in/at/on
Describes an action you are doing.

Most commonly, you would use the word ‘in’ when entering a physical location such as a room or a building.

Here are some examples:

“I’m in the shower.”
“I’m in the lobby.”
“I’m in a car.”
“I’m in a house.”
“I’m in a school.”

Using the word ‘at’ helps tell someone where you currently are. The difference between ‘at’ and ‘in’ is that the physical location is general.

Here are some examples:

“I’m at the grocery.”
“I’m at the mall.”
“I’m at the doctor’s office.”
“I’m at the park.”
“I’m at the airport.”

However, in some cases you can use ‘at’ and ‘in’ interchangeably.

Here are some examples:

“I’m at the mall.”
“I’m in the mall.”
“I’m at the park.”
“I’m in the park.”
“I’m at the grocery.”
“I’m in the grocery.”

Using the word ‘on’ is referring to a non physical location such as your time being utilized by something else.

Here are some examples:

“I’m on the phone.”
“I’m on my computer.”
“I’m on a bus.”

I’m good at
Again, ‘I’m’ is used here as ‘I am.’ ‘Good at’ informs someone what you excel at and are comfortable doing.

Here are some examples:

“I’m good at drawing.”
“I’m good at video games.”
“I’m good at swimming.”
“I’m good at driving.”
“I’m good at reading.”
“I’m good at sports.”
“I’m good at writing.”
“I’m good at math.”
“I’m good at dancing.”
“I’m good at chess.”

I’m + (verb)
‘I’m’ is a contraction of the words ‘I am.’ By adding a verb to ‘I’m’ this lets you express an action or occurrence about yourself.

Here are some examples:

“I’m eating lunch.”
“I’m brushing my teeth.”
“I’m scared.”
“I’m driving to work.”
“I’m crying.”
“I’m typing an email.”
“I’m cooking dinner.”
“I’m combing my hair.”
“I’m hanging a picture.”
“I am texting.”
“I am dancing.”
“I am interested in the job.”
“I am exercising.”
“I am sad.”
“I am learning.”

I’m getting
When combining the words ‘I am’ and ‘getting’ you are telling someone ‘you’ are gaining possession, being affected by or have plans to seek out and obtain a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“I’m getting better.”
“I’m getting ready for bed.”
“I’m getting a tooth ache.”
“I’m getting a cold.”
“I’m getting married.”
“I’m getting tired.”
“I’m getting good at reading.”
“I’m getting a new car.”
“I’m getting a job.”
“I’m getting a puppy.”

I’m trying + (verb)
‘I am trying’ informs someone that you are attempting to accomplish something using bodily, mental, or spiritual strength. By adding a verb to ‘I’m trying’ you are pointing out exactly what it is you are attempting to do.

Here are some examples:

“I’m trying to get a job.”
“I’m trying to call my family.”
“I’m trying to enjoy my dinner.”
“I’m trying to educate myself.”
“I’m trying to explain myself.”
“I’m trying new food.”
“I’m trying to eat healthy.”
“I’m trying to understand.”

I’m gonna + (verb)
The word ‘gonna’ is incorrect grammatically. The equivalent in proper grammar would be ‘going to.’ When using the word ‘gonna’ you are telling someone what you are planning to do at that moment or in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“I’m gonna have some coffee.”
“I’m gonna go to work.”
“I’m gonna eat some cake.”
“I’m gonna send out my resume.”
“I’m gonna run a marathon.”
“I’m gonna ask her out for dinner.”
“I’m gonna stop smoking.”
“I’m gonna help my friends.”
“I’m gonna take swim lessons.”
“I’m gonna read a book.”

I have + (noun)
By using the words ‘I have’ you are informing someone of something you have possession of or have acquired.

Here are some examples:

“I have a cat.”
“I have a nice car.”
“I have a house.”
“I have a computer.”
“I have a headache.”

You may hear the words ‘cannot’ and ‘won’t’ used with ‘I have.’ By adding these you can express what you will not put up with or allow.

Here are some examples:

“I cannot have that behavior in my house.”
“I cannot have you over tonight.”
“I won’t have anything to do with that.”
“I won’t have it any other way.”

I have + (past participle)
Again, ‘I have’ shows possession or something acquired. By adding a past participle you are informing someone of a past or completed action done by you.

Here are some examples:

“I have done it.”
“I have heard that before.”
“I have driven a car.”
“I have forgotten the words.”
“I have read that book.”
“I have eaten at that restaurant before.”
“I have flown in an airplane.”
“I have forgiven you.”
“I have seen you before.”
“I have written a letter.”

I used to + (verb)

‘Used to’ expresses something that was done in the past, and is not usually done now.

Here are some examples:

“I used to develop websites.”
“I used to jog every day.”
“I used to paint.”
“I used to smoke.”
“I used to work from home.”
“I used to live in California.”
“I used to go to the beach every day.”
“I used to sing in a choir.”
“I used to like vegetables.”
“I used to start work at 6 o’clock.”

“I have to + (verb)
The words ‘have to’ describe something that needs to take place soon. It expresses certainty, necessity, or obligation.

Here are some examples:

“I have to switch schools.”
“I have to use the telephone.”
“I have to go to the bathroom.”
“I have to leave.”
“I have to unpack my bags.”

You can also add the word ‘don’t’ to suggest that someone is not required to do something.

“I don’t have to switch schools.”
“I don’t have to use the telephone.”
“I don’t have to go to the bathroom.”
“I don’t have to leave.”
“I don’t have to unpack my bags.”

I wanna + (verb)
The word ‘wanna’ is incorrect grammatically. It is equivalent to ‘want to.’ When combined with the word ‘I’ it helps communicate something you want to do.

Here are some examples:

“I wanna talk.”
“I wanna search for a job.”
“I wanna order some food.”
“I wanna marry her.”
“I wanna listen to that song.”

By adding the word ‘don’t’ you can change the meaning of what you are saying to something you ‘want’ to do to something you ‘do not’ want to do.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t wanna talk.”
“I don’t wanna search for a job.”
“I don’t wanna marry her.”
“I don’t wanna listen to that song.”
“I don’t wanna order some food.”

I gotta + (verb)
‘I gotta’ is grammatically incorrect. It is more of a spoken form. If you want to say this with proper grammar, the equivalent would be, ‘I have got to’ or ‘I’ve got to’. In the spoken form, ‘got to’ is shortened to ‘gotta’ and the word ‘have’ is dropped.

Here are some examples:

“I gotta manage my money.”
“I gotta obey the laws.”
“I gotta move to a bigger house.”
“I gotta impress my boss.”
“I gotta brush my teeth.”

By adding the word ‘have’ you can change what you are saying to express something that needs to be done in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“I have got to be on time to work.”
“I’ve gotta try harder at school.”
“I’ve gotta tell my wife I’ll be late.”
“I’ve gotta learn more about the laws.”
“I’ve gotta clean my house today.”

I would like to + (verb)
This sentence lets someone know what you would be interested in doing. This can be a physical, mental or verbal action.

Here are some examples:

“I would like to answer that question.”
“I would like to compete in a cooking contest.”
“I would like to explain myself.”
“I would like to invite you over.”
“I would like to practice.”
“I would like to become a doctor.”
“I would like to see you more often.”
“I would like to thank you.”
“I would like to learn about animals.”
“I would like to meet the Presiden

I plan to + (verb)
‘Plan to’ describes something that you would like to do in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“I plan to find a new apartment.”
“I plan to relax on vacation.”
“I plan to surprise my parents.”
“I plan to wash my car.”
“I plan to adopt a child.”
“I plan to impress my boss.”
“I plan to watch a movie.”
“I plan to save more money.”
“I plan to read a book.”
“I plan to learn new things.”

I’ve decided to + (verb)
‘I’ve’ is short for ‘I have’ and including the word ‘decided’ you are stating that you have made a decision or come to a conclusion.

Here are some examples:

“I’ve decided to accept the job.”
“I’ve decided to complete my degree.”
“I’ve decided to change my bad habits.”
“I’ve decided to extend my membership at the gym.”
“I’ve decided to form a chess club.”
“I’ve decided to hand over my responsibilities.”
“I’ve decided to help you move.”
“I’ve decided to interview for the job.”
“I’ve decided to increase my work load.”
“I’ve decided to manage a store.”

I was about to + (verb)
When stating ‘I was about to’ you are informing someone that you are going to be doing something at that moment or in the very near future.

Here are some examples:

“I was about to go out.”
“I was about to go to dinner.”
“I was about to go to bed.”
“I was about to go to work.”
“I was about to say the same thing.”
“I was about to call you.”
“I was about to send you an email.”
“I was about to mow my grass.”
“I was about to order us some drinks.”
“I was about to watch television.”

I didn’t mean to + (verb)
The word ‘didn’t’ is a contraction of the words ‘did not’. When using it in a sentence with the words ‘mean to’ you are informing someone that you did something you regret or are sorry for. This could have been a physical, mental or verbal action.

Here are some examples:

“I didn’t mean to hurt your feelings.”
“I didn’t mean to call you so late.”
“I didn’t mean to lie about what happened.”
“I didn’t mean to embarrass you.”
“I didn’t mean to stay out so late.”
“I did not mean to say those things.”
“I did not mean to leave you out.”
“I did not mean to make you confused.”
“I did not mean to think you were involved.”
“I did not mean to cause trouble.”

I don’t have time to + (verb)
The word ‘don’t’ is a contraction of the words ‘do not.’ When adding ‘have time to’ you are simply stating that you have other obligations and all other things considered must wait.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t have time to explain.”
“I don’t have time to eat.”
“I don’t have time to exercise.”
“I don’t have time to watch my favorite TV show.”
“I don’t have time to talk.”

You can also use the phrase ‘I don’t’ to express things you do not like, things you do not understand, or things you do not do.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t eat meat.”
“I don’t like the rain.”
“I don’t understand Spanish.”
“I do not understand what you are saying.”
“I do not like scary movies.”
“I do not like sports.”

I promise not to + (verb)
When using the word ‘promise’ you are giving your word that what you are saying is true. You might also be assuring someone a guarantee that you will follow thru on what you are saying to them.

When using ‘promise not to’ you are stating you will not do a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“I promise not to tell.”
“I promise not to leave without you.”
“I promise not to be so late.”
“I promise not to hurt your feelings.”
“I promise not to wake you up.”

You can also just use the word ‘promise’ to assure someone of your intentions.

Here are some examples:

“I promise I am telling the truth.”
“I promise to practice my math.”
“I promise to call you.”
“I promise I will tell you.”
“I promise I will come to your party.”

I’d rather + (verb)
‘I’d’ is a contraction of the words ‘I had’ or ‘I would.’

When using it with the word ‘rather’ you are suggesting you would like to do or prefer one thing more than another.

Here are some examples:

“I’d rather talk about this later.”
“I’d like to eat at home than go get fast food.”
“I’d rather ski than snowboard.”
“I’d rather stay late than come in early tomorrow.”
“I’d rather handle the problem myself.”
“I had rather go home than stay out too late.”
“I had rather listen to my parents or get in trouble.”
“I would rather exercise than sit on the couch all day.”
“I would rather complete my task early.”
“I would rather know the answer.”

I feel like + (verb-ing)
Here you are expressing to someone something you would enjoy doing.

Here are some examples:

“I feel like going for a bike ride.”
“I feel like going to the beach.”
“I feel like having a snack.”
“I feel like talking.”
“I feel like dancing.”
“I feel like having friends over to my house.”
“I feel like watching TV.”

By adding ‘don’t’ or ‘do not’ you can change what you are saying to express something you would not enjoy or express a concern about something.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t feel like leaving yet.”
“I don’t feel like explaining.”
“I don’t feel like going to bed.”
“I do not feel comfortable talking about it.”
“I do not feel like we are going in the right direction.”

I can’t help + (verb-ing)
The word ‘can’t’ is contraction for ‘cannot.’ Combined with ‘help’ you are communicating something you are unable to control or having a hard time gaining a grasp for. This can be a physical or mental action.

Here are some examples:

“I can’t help thinking about it.”
“I can’t help shopping so much.”
“I can’t help working all the time.”
“I can’t help smiling when I see her.”
“I can’t help eating so much.”
“I can’t help loving you.”
“I can not help biting my nails when I am nervous.”
“I can not help smoking when I have been drinking.”
“I cannot help feeling so sad.”
“I cannot help remembering the things you did.”

I was busy + (verb-ing)
When using the word ‘was’, you are referring to something in a past tense, or something that happened before. Combining it with the word ‘busy’ you can express something that was occupying you in a past time.

Here are some examples:

“I was busy thinking.”
“I was busy working.”
“I was busy cooking dinner.”
“I was busy talking on the phone.”
“I was busy cleaning the house.”
“I was busy studying for my test.”
“I was busy thinking of ideas for our website.”
“I was busy entertaining our neighbors.”
“I was busy completing my housework.”
“I was busy learning new things.”

By changing ‘was’ to ‘am’ you change your message from past tense to present tense and refer to something you are doing ‘now.’

Here are some examples:

“I am busy working.”
“I am busy cooking dinner.”
“I am busy studying for my test.”
“I am busy completing housework.”
“I am busy talking on the phone.”

I’m not used to + (verb-ing)
Here you are using ‘not used to’ to inform someone that you are unfamiliar or uncomfortable with a topic at hand.

Here are some examples:

“I’m not used to talking English.”
“I’m not used to studying so much.”
“I’m not used to being around new people.”
“I’m not used to talking in front of groups of people.”
“I’m not used to having so much stress.”
“I’m not used to traveling so much.”
“I’m not used to working so early.”
“I’m not used to having so much responsibility.”
“I’m not used to drinking so much.”

I want you to + (verb)
‘I want you to’ is telling someone that you have a desire or would like for them to do something.

Here are some examples:

“I want you to clean the dishes.”
“I want you to come home right after school.”
“I want you to call once you get there.”
“I want you to explain yourself to me.”
“I want you to educate me.”

By using the word ‘need’ instead of ‘want’ you are expressing something that is required or wanted.

Here are some examples:

“I need you to study harder in school.”
“I need you to stop and listen to me.”
“I need you to greet our guests.”
“I need you to introduce me to your family.”
“I need to request a refund.”

I’m here to + (verb)
You are informing someone that you are at a particular place to accomplish something.

Here are some examples:

“I’m here to apply for the job.”
“I’m here to take a test.”
“I’m here to receive my gift.”
“I’m here to support all your decisions.”
“I’m here to watch a movie.”
“I’m here to work on your computer.”
“I’m here to welcome you to the neighborhood.”
“I’m here to raise awareness for cancer.”
“I’m here to start the job.”
“I’m here to receive the award.”

I have something + (verb)
When using the expression ‘I have something’ you are communicating that you possess something or need to do something that is unspecified or undetermined.

Here are some examples:

“I have something to complete.”
“I have something to share with you.”
“I have something important to tell you.”
“I have something to encourage you.”
“I have something to explain to you.”
“I have something special planned for your birthday.”
“I have something else to consider.”
“I have something to apologize about.”
“I have something to attend tonight.”
“I have something to ask you.”
“I have something fun for us to do.”

I’m looking forward to
When telling someone that you are ‘looking forward to’ you are saying that you are waiting or hoping for something, especially with pleasure.

Here are some examples:

“I’m looking forward to meeting you.”
“I’m looking forward to talking with you.”
“I’m looking forward to going on vacation.”
“I’m looking forward to spending time with my family.”
“I’m looking forward to learning the English language.”
“I am looking forward to visiting another country.”
“I am looking forward to having a family.”
“I am looking forward to graduating from college.”
“I am looking forward to watching the baseball game.”
“I am looking forward to running in a race.”

English Speaking Basics – Section II

English Speaking Basics II is for English speaking beginners who need help to understand the basics of speaking English. We will use very simple phrases and expressions to help you with your English speaking.

This second section contains the next 30 lessons. If any lessons are too easy, please move forward to other lessons.

I’m calling to + (verb)
When using the words ‘I’m calling’ you are stating that you are actually using the phone to call and relay information.

Here are some examples:

“I’m calling to tell you about my day.”
“I’m calling to accept your invitation.”
“I’m calling to answer your question.”
“I’m calling to book a reservation at your restaurant.”
“I’m calling to complain about something.”
“I’m calling to thank you.”
“I’m calling to support your decision.”
“I’m calling to remind you of our dinner plans.”
“I’m calling to report a lost wallet.”
“I’m calling to receive my prize.”

I’m working on + (noun)
‘I’m’ is a contraction for the words ‘I am.’ The phrase ‘working on’ relays a physical or mental effort towards an accomplishment.

Here are some examples:

“I’m working on a big project.”
“I’m working on training my dog.”
“I’m working on making new friends.”
“I’m working on educating myself.”
“I’m working on my homework.”
“I am working on painting a house.”
“I am working on a new idea.”
“I am working on my computer.”
“I’m working on my website.”

I’m sorry to + (verb)
Saying you are ‘sorry to’ expresses a feeling of sympathy or regret.

Here are some examples:

“I’m sorry to be so late.”
“I’m sorry to hear about your sick mother.”
“I’m sorry to waste your time.”
“I’m sorry to make you feel so sad.”
“I’m sorry to frighten you.”
“I’m sorry to disagree with your decision.”
“I’m sorry to call so late.”
“I’m sorry to admit what I did.”
“I’m sorry to end this relationship.”

I’m thinking of + (verb-ing)
‘Thinking’ refers to a process of thought, forming an opinion or judgment. When expressing ‘I am thinking of’ you are letting someone know what you are personally thinking.

Here are some examples:

“I’m thinking of checking out the new movie.”
“I’m thinking of filming my vacation.”
“I’m thinking of following a healthy diet.”
“I’m thinking of handing out flyers describing our business.”
“I’m thinking of increasing my work load.”
“I am thinking of introducing myself to him.”
“I am thinking of launching a new website.”
“I am thinking of moving to a new city.”
“I am thinking of offering her the position.”
“I am thinking of opening up a store.”

I’ll help you + (verb)
This lets you inform someone that you are willing to provide assistance. This could refer to something physical or mental, like helping someone to ‘think’ or ‘remember’ something.

Here are some examples:

“I’ll help you cook dinner tonight.”
“I’ll help you raise money for your charity.”
“I’ll help you register for your class online.”
“I’ll help you move to your new house.”
“I’ll help you prevent that from happening again.”
“I will help you park your car.”
“I will help you provide all the information you need.”
“I will help you realize your potential.”
“I will help you stop smoking.”
“I will help you shop for groceries.”

I’m dying to + (verb)
When using the word ‘dying’ in this manner you are referring to wanting or desiring something greatly.

Here are some examples:

“I’m dying to relax on the beach.”
“I’m dying to pick some fresh fruit.”
“I’m dying to order some desserts.”
“I’m dying to find out if I got the job.”
“I’m dying to move to a bigger house.”
“I’m dying to look at all the work you’ve done.”
“I’m dying to learn more about you.”
“I’m dying to introduce you to my parents.”
“I’m dying to expand my business.”
“I’m dying to check my score on the test.”

It’s my turn to + (verb)
The word ‘It’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘it is.’ When stating ‘my turn’ you are telling someone that it is time to change position or position focuses on to you.

Here are some examples:

“It’s my turn to walk you home.”
“It’s my turn to do laundry.”
“It’s my turn to work late.”
“It’s my turn to take out the trash.”
“It’s my turn to choose where we eat.”
“It is my turn to pay for dinner.”
“It is my turn to roll the dice.”
“It is my turn to provide an answer.”
“It is my turn to try and play the game.”
“It is my turn to attempt solving the problem.”

It’s hard for me to + (verb)
When saying that something is ‘hard for me’ you are informing someone that what you are talking about is difficult or challenging for you.

Here are some examples:

“It’s hard for me to accept what you are telling me.”
“It’s hard for me to argue your point.”
“It’s hard for me to balance my check book.”
“It’s hard for me to concentrate on the task.”
“It’s hard for me to consider your other options.”
“It’s hard for me to depend on you.”
“It is hard for me to decide where to go tonight.”
“It is hard for me to explain my actions.”
“It is hard for me to guarantee your success.”
“It is hard for me to handle so much pressure.”

I’m having a hard time + (verb-ing)
By stating you are having a hard time you are letting someone know you are having difficulty with something. This could be something physical or mental and something that could be overcome with effort.

Here are some examples:

“I’m having a hard time writing.”
“I’m having a hard time understanding you.”
“I’m having a hard time answering your question.”
“I’m having a hard time downloading songs to my iPod.”
“I’m having a hard time agreeing to the terms.”

With the addition of a verb you can express in more detail just how difficult something is for you.

Here are some examples:

“I’m having an extremely hard time trusting you.”
“I’m having an extremely hard time with my wife.”
“I’m having a very hard time finding a job.”
“I’m having a very hard time finding parts for my car.”

I think I should + (verb)
Here you are telling someone that you feel strongly about doing a particular action. Here are some examples:

“I think I should practice my reading.”
“I think I should join a study group.”
“I think I should handle this as soon as possible.”
“I think I should earn my degree.”
“I think I should explain myself.”

By adding the word ‘don’t’ you have changed what you are conveying from something you are thinking of doing, to something you are against.

Here are some examples:

“I do not think I should complain so much.”
“I do not think I should attend that event.”
“I do not think I should borrow more money.”
“I do not think I should doubt you.”
“I do not think I should decide until later.”

I’ve heard that + (subject + verb)
You are letting someone know that you are aware of something or that you have been informed of something that is taking place. This could be something that has already happened or something happening in the near future. ‘I’ve’ is a contraction of the words ‘I have.’

Here are some examples:

“I’ve heard that you got a new job.”
“I’ve heard that you want to leave your job.”
“I’ve heard that you got a new car.”
“I’ve heard that you like to jog.”
“I’ve heard that you fix computers.”
“I’ve heard that you’ve never been to Canada.”
“I’ve heard that you like to shop.”
“I’ve heard that you and your boss don’t get along.”
“I’ve heard that there is no school next week.”
“I’ve heard that your wife is a yoga instructor.”

It occurred to me that (subject + verb)
The word ‘occurred’ informs someone that something has come to mind or has been found. You are letting someone know that you suddenly have thought or remembered about something.

Here are some examples:

“It occurred to me that I forgot your birthday.”
“It occurred to me that we both belong to the same gym.”
“It occurred to me that we enjoy a lot of the same things.”
“It occurred to me the price for homes are more expensive here.”
“It occurred to me that eating healthy makes me feel better.”

Using the word ‘had’ or ‘has’ can change what you are saying to represent something remembered in a past time.

Here are some examples:

“It had occurred to me that I forgot something at the grocery.”
“It had occurred to me I might need to change my email address.”
“It has occurred to me I forgot my mom’s birthday.”
“It has occurred to me before.”

Let me + (verb)
‘Let me’ is suggesting that you are asking for permission or an opportunity to do something.

Here are some examples:

“Let me make my own decisions.”
“Let me offer to help you.”
“Let me open the door for you.”
“Let me pause and think about what we are doing.”
“Let me welcome you to the neighborhood.”
“Let me save you the trouble.”
“Let me make a suggestion.”
“Let me try and fix your car.”
“Let me taste the soup before you add more spices.”
“Let me treat you to some ice cream.”

Thank you for
Saying ‘thank you’ is telling someone you appreciate what they have done. This can either be something they did for you or for someone else.

Here are some examples:

“Thank you for inviting me.”
“Thank you for helping me move.”
“Thank you for informing me about the job opening.”
“Thank you for mailing that package for me.”
“Thank you for working so hard.”
“Thank you for stopping by to visit.”
“Thank you for replying to my email.”
“Thank you for providing me with the answers.”
“Thank you for heating up dinner.”
“Thank you for hurrying to get here.”

Can I + (verb)
When ending a sentence with a question mark (?) you are asking the person or people you are talking to a question for which you would like an answer. Here you are asking permission to do a particular action.

Here are some examples:

“Can I answer your question?”
“Can I attend the event?”
“Can I move to another spot?”
“Can I call you tomorrow?”
“Can I complete this later?”
“Can I explain myself?”
“Can I help you with your homework?”
“Can I include you in our plans?”
“Can I introduce you to my co-workers?”
“Can I inform you of some bad news?”

Can I get + (noun)
The phrase ‘Can I get’ can be used in a couple different ways. You can use it to ask a question.

Here are some examples:

“Can I get a cup of water?”
“Can I get a dog?”
“Can I get lunch?”
“Can I get sugar in my coffee?”
“Can I get popcorn at the movie?”

You can also use it when offering to help someone or do something for them.

Here are some examples:

“Can I get you another drink?”
“Can I help you move that?”
“Can I recommend a good place to eat?”
“Can I take you home?”
“Can I help you finish your project?”

I’m not sure if (subject + verb)
‘I’m not sure’ expresses a feeling of uncertainty or lack of confidence on a particular matter.

Here are some examples:

“I am not sure if they will offer me the job.”
“I’m not sure if she’ll return my call.”
“I’m not sure if my wife will understand.”
“I’m not sure if we will go out tonight.”
“I’m not sure if I understand your question.”
“I am not sure if I can handle it.”
“I am not sure if it will happen.”
“I am not sure if it will matter.”
“I am not sure if my mom will notice.”
“I am not sure if they will permit us to park there.”

Do you mind if I + (verb)
You are asking someone in present tense if they object to something you are asking.

Here are some examples:

“Do you mind if I excuse myself?”
“Do you mind if we left early?”
“Do you mind if I take a nap?”
“Do you mind if I ask your mom?”
“Do you mind if it snows?”

You could also use the word ‘would’

Here are some examples:

“Would you mind if we went out to eat?”
“Would you mind if I opened the window?”
“Would you mind telling me what you’re doing?”
“Would you mind being quiet for a minute?”
“Would you mind if I changed the channel?”

I don’t know what to + (verb)
You are letting someone know that you are not sure about what is being asked. You may also have no knowledge or opinion on a topic.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t know what to eat for dinner.”
“I don’t know what to buy you for your birthday.”
“I don’t know what to say.”
“I don’t know what to do with my spare time.”
“I don’t know what to do for vacation.”
“I do not know what to do to make you happy.”
“I do not know what to do to help you understand.”
“I do not know what to think.”
“I do not know what to do to prevent this.”
“I do not know what to order.”

I should have + (past participle)
‘Should’ is the past tense of the word ‘shall.’ When using the words ‘should have’ you are talking about something in the past that you ‘ought to’ or ‘might have’ done.

Here are some examples:

“I should have gone with you.”
“I should have studied more for my test.”
“I should have read the directions before starting.”
“I should have eaten breakfast this morning.”
“I should have listened to your advice.”
“I should have married her when I had the chance.”

‘Shall’ is something that will take place or exist in the future.

Here are some examples:

“I shall leave tomorrow.”
“I shall finish the job next week.”
“I shall see it tomorrow.”
“I shall go outside if it’s nice out.”
“I shall pay for this later.”

I wish I could + (verb)
You are expressing a desire to do something.

Here are some examples:

“I wish I could sing better.”
“I wish I could settle the argument.”
“I wish I could sail around the world.”
“I wish I could remain calm during all of this.”
“I wish I could remember his name.”
“I wish I could replace my old car with a new one.”
“I wish I could play outside.”
“I wish I could go to the game with you.”
“I wish I could write better.”
“I wish I could own my own business.”

You should + (verb)
Here you are suggesting an obligation or duty that needs to take place either now or in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“You should go to bed.”
“You should do your homework before going outside.”
“You should replace you headlights on your car.”
“You should request a raise at work.”
“You should stop smoking.”
“You should smile more.”
“You should slow down when driving in a neighborhood.”
“You should talk to him about it.”
“You should train your dog.”
“You should trust what they say.”

You’re supposed to + (verb)
‘You’re’ is a contraction of the words ‘you are.’ When using ‘You’re’ with the words ‘supposed to’ you are making a suggestion that something you strongly believe ought to happen.

Here are some examples:

“You’re supposed to keep that secret.”
“You’re supposed to let me know when you leave.”
“You’re supposed to stop when at a red light.”
“You’re supposed to unpack once you get there.”
“You’re supposed to return the movies you rent on time.”
“You are supposed to remain calm.”
“You are supposed to fasten your seat belt.”
“You are supposed to invite all your friends.”
“You are supposed to encourage one another.”
“You are supposed to decide before next Thursday.”

You seem + (adjective)
When stating ‘you seem’ you’re referring to the person you are talking to and expressing that they are giving the impression of or appear to be.

Here are some examples:

“You seem bored.”
“You seem unhappy with the results.”
“You seem eager to begin.”
“You seem easy to get along with.”
“You seem elated to hear the good news.”
“You seem deeply in love.”
“You seem afraid of roller coasters.”
“You seem confused about the rules of the game.”
“You seem embarrassed about what happened.”
“You seem decisive about your choice.”

You’d better + (verb)
‘You’d’ is a contraction of ‘you had’ or ‘you would.’ You are making a suggestion to someone for a particular action.

Here are some examples:

“You’d better exercise.”
“You’d better help out.”
“You’d better invite your brother.”
“You’d better impress the judges.”
“You’d better listen to your parents.”
“You had better not come home late.”
“You had better hope for the best.”
“You had better change your attitude.”
“You would be good at teaching.”
“You would do well at math.”

Are you into + (noun)
Here you are asking a question about an interest they might have or something they might enjoy doing.

Here are some examples:

“Are you into soccer?”
“Are you into trying new things?”
“Are you into wine tasting?”
“Are you into working out at home or at the gym?”
“Are you into scary movies?”
“Are you into playing games?”
“Are you into jogging?”
“Are you into painting?”
“Are you into traveling?”
“Are you into fixing cars?”

Are you trying to + (verb)
You are asking someone if they are attempting to do something. This can be something mentally or physically.

Here are some examples:

“Are you trying to ignore me?”
“Are you trying to manage your money?”
“Are you trying to memorize that song?”
“Are you trying to offer your help?”
“Are you trying to program your new phone?”
“Are you trying to pretend like it never happened?”
“Are you trying to remain calm?”
“Are you trying to remember her name?”
“Are you trying to reflect on the past?”
“Are you trying to switch flights?”

Please + (verb)
‘Please’ is generally used in a polite request when asking someone to do something.

Here are some examples:

“Please pass me the salt.”
“Please order me the steak and potatoes.”
“Please stop bothering me.”
“Please wash your hands before dinner.”
“Please wait outside until we are ready.”
“Please zip up your coat before you go outside.”
“Please stand back.”

The word ‘please’ can also mean to give enjoyment or satisfaction to.

Here are some examples:

“The smell of the flowers was very pleasing.”
“May it please the court to admit this into evidence?”
“I was very pleased with how the children behaved in class.”
“You cannot please everyone all the time.”
“She was pleased with the dress.”

Don’t + (verb)
The word ‘don’t’ is a contraction of the words ‘do not.’ It is said to convey a message of what NOT should be done.

Here are some examples:

“Don’t try and fool me.”
“Don’t allow this to happen.”
“Don’t watch scary movies before you go to bed.”
“Don’t cause any more trouble.”
“Don’t chew gum in class.”
“Do not concern yourself with other people’s problems.”
“Do not behave that way.”
“Do not announce your decision until you’re ready.”
“Do not argue with me.”
“Do not arrive late for your meeting.

Do you like
With this question you are asking someone what they prefer or enjoy.

Here are some examples:

“Do you like traveling on a plane?”
“Do you like watching baseball on TV?”
“Do you like skiing or snowboarding?”
“Do you like going to bed early?”
“Do you like spending time with me?”
“Do you like repeating the class?”
“Do you like playing video games?”
“Do you like listening to music?”
“Do you like practicing playing the piano?”
“Do you like jogging with me?”

How often do you
When asking this question you are inquiring how often or how frequent someone does a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“How often do you exercise?”
“How often do you change your password?”
“How often do you help out at school?”
“How often do you listen to your MP3 player?”
“How often do you need to go to the dentist?”
“How often do you receive your magazine in the mail?”
“How often do you report to your supervisor?”
“How often do you stretch before working out?”
“How often do you talk to your parents?”
“How often do you travel?”

Do you want me to + (verb)
To ‘want’ is to feel or have a desire for. When saying ‘Do you want me to’ you’re asking someone if there is anything you can do for them or assist them with.

Here are some examples:

“Do you want me to pick up the kids?”
“Do you want me to fix your flat tire?”
“Do you want me to help you read that book?”
“Do you want me to remind you?”
“Do you want me to remove my shoes?”

The word ‘want’ can also be used to express something YOU would like someone else to do or that something you personally would enjoy.

Here are some examples:

“I want you to come over.”
“I want you to make a decision.”
“I want you to water the flowers.”
“I want to understand what you are trying to say.”
“I want to be better at swimming.”
“I want to be more involved at church.”

What do you think about (verb-ing)
This question asks someone their opinion about a topic.

Here are some examples:

“What do you think about having a cup of tea with me?”
“What do you think about working overtime next week?”
“What do you think about waiting in line for tickets?”
“What do you think about sailing?”
“What do you think about staying here another night?”
“What do you think about retiring from your job?”
“What do you think about planting new trees in the backyard?”
“What do you think about offering to babysit?”
“What do you think about living in a new city?”
“What do you think about filming our vacation?”

Why don’t we + (verb)
‘Don’t’ is a contraction of ‘do not.’ When using ‘why’ you are asking a question that involves yourself and the person you are talking to.

Here are some examples:

“Why don’t we go bowling tonight?”
“Why don’t we pick some fresh flowers?”
“Why don’t we play a game of chess?”
“Why don’t we save more money?”
“Why don’t we remember this place?”
“Why don’t we test this before using it?”
“Why don’t we try and do it again?”
“Why don’t we post our results online?”
“Why don’t we gather more firewood?”
“Why don’t we earn more money?”

It’s too bad that
‘Too bad’ means regrettable or unfortunate. When using it in a sentence you are expressing a concern or regret for what has taken place. The topic being discussed could have happened to you, the person you are talking to, or someone or something else.

Here are some examples:

“It’s too bad that she lost her job.”
“It’s too bad that you have to go.”
“It’s too bad that I found out about it.”
“It’s too bad we will not be there on time.”
“It’s too bad that tickets are all gone to that concert.”
“It’s too bad that it is supposed to rain.”
“It’s too bad that she got hurt.”
“It’s too bad that my work has to lay off people.”
“It’s too bad that you do not understand.”

You could have + (past participle)
Using ‘could have’ you are speaking about something that was, should be or would be. You are stating that they had other options that could have been chosen.

Here are some examples:

“You could have completed it sooner.”
“You could have blown your chance.”
“You could have done better on your exam.”
“You could have given me more time to get ready.”
“You could have heard that from someone else.”
“You could have sent that package first class.”
“You could have slept in a little longer.”
“You could have written him a letter.”
“You could have thought of something to do.”
“You could have upset her by saying that.” If I were you, I would + (verb)
Here you are giving an example of what decision YOU would do given the circumstances. This can be in past tense or in a conditional present.

Here are some examples:

“If I were you, I would enjoy my vacation.”
“If I were you, I would explain what happened.”
“If I were you, I would continue working until it is done.”
“If I were you, I would book my reservations now.”
“If I were you, I would answer the question.”

By adding ‘have’ after the word ‘would’ you are talking about something in the past tense.

Here are some examples:

“If I were you, I would have enjoyed my vacation.”
“If I were you, I would have explained what happened.”
“If I were you, I would have continued working until it was done.”
“If I were you, I would have booked my reservations now.”
“If I were you, I would have answered the question.”

It’s gonna be + (adjective)
You’re informing someone what something is going to be like. This could be something you are going to do, see or feel.

Here are some examples:

“It’s going to be delicious.”
“It’s gonna be easy.”
“It’s gonna be depressing.”
“It’s going to be exciting.”
“It’s going to be disgusting.”

You can also add ‘he or she’ or a person’s name to describe how they might react to something.

Here are some examples:

“He is going to be tough to deal with.”
“He is going to be terrific at that.”
“She is going to be relieved to hear that.”
“She is going to be scared after watching that movie.”
“Sally is going to be successful.”

It looks like + (noun)
You could be describing how something is similar or appears to be by the way it looks.

Here are some examples:

“It looks like a balloon.”
“It looks like a jellyfish.”
“It looks like a banana.”
“It looks like a fish.”
You can also use ‘it looks like’ to describe something that might be in the future.

Here are some examples:

“It looks like it’s going to rain.”
“It looks like it’s going to be fun.”
“It looks like it’s going to be a long day.”

You can also use it to describe something in the present tense.

Here are some examples:

“It looks like they are leaving.”
“It looks like he is waving to us.”
“It looks like she is lost.”
“It looks like they are racing.”
That’s why + (subject + verb)
‘That’s’ is short for ‘that is.’ Here you are telling someone ‘because of this’ or ‘therefore.’

Here are some examples:

“That’s why people admire you.”
“That’s why she appears so happy.”
“That’s why babies crawl before they can walk.”
“That’s why Pam cries at sad movies.”
“That’s why you fail to understand.”
“That is why you help out people in need.”
“That is why you try and include everyone.”
“That is why you lock your doors when you leave home.”
“That is why she smiles when you walk by.”
“That is why you use it for emergencies.”

It’s time to + (verb)
You are letting someone know that something is required to be done at the present time.

Here are some examples:

“It’s time to say goodbye.”
“It’s time to ask for a raise.”
“It’s time to collect our money.”
“It’s time to cheer for our team.”
“It’s time to change the clocks.”
“It is time to decide what to do.”
“It is time to enjoy ourselves.”
“It is time to fill me in on what’s going on.”
“It is time to help out.”
“It is time to join a gym.”

The point is that + (subject + verb)
By stating ‘the point is’ you are stating in your opinion the meaning about what is actually happening.

Here are some examples:

“The point is that if you study you will do well in school.”
“The point is that she does not understand.”
“The point is that we need this done today.”
“The point is that the world would be a better place.”
“The point is that we should help.”
“The point is that snakes can be dangerous.”
“The point is that leaving a baby alone is not a good idea.”
“The point is that if we do not leave now we will be late.”
“The point is that she needs to be more responsible.”
“The point is that we need to work together.”

How was + (noun)
By using the words ‘how was’ you are asking someone a question about something that happened or something they did in the past.

Here are some examples:

“How was your meeting?”
“How was your doctor’s appointment?”
“How was the birthday party?”
“How was lunch?”
“How was the airplane ride?”
“How was vacation?”
“How were your parents?”
“How were roads when you drove home?”
“How were people acting after what happened?”
“How were holidays with the family?”

How about + (verb-ing)
You’re asking someone their opinion on something or if they would like to do something.

Here are some examples:

“How about singing?”
“How about hanging out tonight?”
“How about folding the laundry for me?”
“How about helping us out?”
“How about describing to me what happened?”
“How about exploring new ideas?”
“How about comparing prices before we buy it?”
“How about considering it?”
“How about following me to their house?”
“How about feeding the dogs?”

What if + (subject + verb)
Here you are asking a question about ‘in the event of’ or ‘in the event that.’ Usually you are looking for an answer at the time of the question that is being asked.

Here are some examples:

“What if I miss the bus?”
“What if I were late to dinner?”
“What if I called her tomorrow?”
“What if I don’t understand?”
“What if someone sees me?”
“What if no one is home?”
“What if they decide to stay?”
“What if it rains while we are camping?”
“What if I do not finish on time?”
“What if we introduce ourselves first?”

How much does it cost to + (verb)
You are simply asking how much you would need to pay to do something.

Here are some examples:

“How much does it cost to fly to Europe?”
“How much does it cost to own a house?”
“How much does it cost to play a round of golf?”
“How much does it cost to join a gym?”
“How much does it cost to repair my car?”
“How much would it cost to talk long distance?”
“How much would it cost to run a website?”
“How much would it cost to wash my car?”
“How much would it cost to rent a car?”
“How much would it cost to go to the movies?”

How come + (subject + verb)
When using ‘how come’ you are asking why a particular thing has or had to take place.

Here are some examples:

“How come parents worry so much?”
“How come people carpool to work?”
“How come you are so upset?”
“How come he will not call you?”
“How come you stayed out so late?”
“How come you cannot make a decision?”
“How come you always question me?”
“How come we never agree?”
“How come your dog digs in the yard?”
“How come she will not come over?”

What are the chances of + (verb-ing)
By asking ‘what are the chances of’ you are wondering how often or in what case would a particular thing happen.

Here are some examples:

“What are the chances of getting tickets?”
“What are the chances of that happening?”
“What are the chances of it raining today?”
“What are the chances of winning the lottery?”

When replacing the word ‘the’ with ‘your’ or ‘our’ you can ask what the chances ‘personally’ that the topic will happen.

Here are some examples:

“What are the chances of you staying home today?”
“What are your chances of getting the job?”
“What are your chances of improving?”
“What are your chances of moving?”
“What are our chances of staying together?”
“What are our chances of working together?”
“What are our chances of going together?”

There is something wrong with + (noun)
You are informing someone that there is something not right or out of the ordinary.

Here are some examples:

“There is something wrong with my laptop.”
“There is something wrong with my car.”
“There is something wrong with my cell phone.”
“There is something wrong with my head.”
“There is something wrong with your answering machine.”
“There is something wrong with your way of thinking.”
“There is something wrong with your attitude.”
“There is something wrong with your dog.”
“There is something wrong with our relationship.”
“There is something wrong with our alarm clock.”

Let’s not + (verb)
The word ‘let’s’ is formed from the words ‘let us.’ Here you are requesting that something not take place at this moment or that what is happening needs to be contained or lessened.

Here are some examples:

“Let’s not discuss this now.”
“Let’s not stay here too long.”
“Let’s not stop anywhere on the way.”
“Let’s not remain mad at each other.”
“Let’s not meddle in other people’s business.”
“Let us not get too excited.”
“Let us not worry too much.”
“Let us not interrupt them when they are talking.”
“Let us help you.”
“Let us get that for you.”

Let’s say that + (subject + verb)
‘Let’s’ is a contraction for ‘let us.’ You are suggesting to someone that you should both agree on what you will communicate to someone else.

Here are some examples:

“Let’s say that you love to fish.”
“Let’s say we found it.”
“Let’s say that we enjoy being with them.”
“Let’s say that we had a good time.”
“Let’s say that it’s hard to decide.”
“Let’s say that we have to go.”
“Let’s say that we can host.”
“Let’s say that I have to work.”
“Let’s say that the movie was really good.”

There’s no need to + (verb)
The word ‘there’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘there is’ or ‘there has.’ When expressing ‘no need’ you are stating that the action does not need to take place.

Here are some examples:

“There’s no need to worry.”
“There’s no need to be upset.”
“There’s no need to act so strange.”
“There’s no need to act so shy.”
“There’s no need to rush off.”
“There’s no need to talk now.”
“There is no need to call this late.”
“There is no need to bother him.”
“There is no need to run away.”
“There is no need to stop now.”

It takes + (time) + to + (verb)
You are letting someone know how long it will take to do a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“It takes one hour to get there.”
“It takes forty-five minutes for me to get ready.”
“It takes four quarters to complete a football game.”
“It takes 7 seconds for my car to go 60 miles per hour.”
“It takes all day for us to finish golfing.”
“It takes years to learn to play guitar.”
“It takes 15 minutes to get to downtown.”
“It takes me one hour to cook.”

Please make sure that + (subject + verb)
You are asking someone to make sure that a particular thing happens or takes place.

Here are some examples:

“Please make sure that she wakes up on time.”
“Please make sure that she gets to school.”
“Please make sure that dinner is ready when we get home.”
“Please make sure that your assignment is done.”
“Please make sure that the water is not too hot.”
“Please make sure you cook the meat long enough.”
“Please make sure that she is getting along with her new friends.”
“Please make sure that we leave on time.”
“Please make sure you record our favorite TV show.”
“Please make sure that you don’t stay out too late.”

Here’s to + (noun)
‘Here’s to’ is used in a way of celebrating or identifying a person, place, or thing of significance. It is usually said while toasting someone at dinner, or signaling to someone or something after an event.

Here are some examples:

“Here’s to the winner!”
“Here’s to your marriage!”
“Here’s to the New Year!”
“Here’s to great friends!”
“Here’s to starting a new job!”
“Here is to the luckiest guy in the world!”
“Here is to you!”
“Here is to happiness!”
“Here is to a wonderful day!”
“Here is to great memories!”

It’s no use + (verb-ing)
‘It’s’ is a contraction for ‘it is.’ By stating ‘it’s no use’ you are saying that what you or someone else is doing is not recommended or uncalled for.

Here are some examples:

“It’s no use crying.”
“It’s no use separating them.”
“It’s no use talking to her.”
“It’s no use whining about it.”
“It’s no use apologizing.”
“It’s no use attempting to please him.”
“It’s no use arguing about it.”
“It’s no use behaving that way.”
“It’s no use cleaning up.”
“It’s no use checking on it yet.”

There’s no way + (subject + verb)
‘There’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘there is.’ By stating ‘there’s no way’ you are relaying a thought of doubt about an event taking place now or in the future.

Here are some examples:

“There’s no way you finish on time.”
“There’s no way we complete on time.”
“There’s no way your mother approves.”
“There’s no way no one claims it.”
“There’s no way they expect it.”
“There’s no way he can fix it.”
“There’s no way he can handle the news.”
“There’s no way your brother injured his ankle.”
“There is no way that horse jumps it.”
“There is no way he missed it.”
It takes + (time) + to + (verb)
You are letting someone know how long it will take to do a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“It takes one hour to get there.”
“It takes forty-five minutes for me to get ready.”
“It takes four quarters to complete a football game.”
“It takes 7 seconds for my car to go 60 miles per hour.”
“It takes all day for us to finish golfing.”
“It takes years to learn to play guitar.”
“It takes 15 minutes to get to downtown.”
“It takes me one hour to cook.”

Please make sure that + (subject + verb)
You are asking someone to make sure that a particular thing happens or takes place.

Here are some examples:

“Please make sure that she wakes up on time.”
“Please make sure that she gets to school.”
“Please make sure that dinner is ready when we get home.”
“Please make sure that your assignment is done.”
“Please make sure that the water is not too hot.”
“Please make sure you cook the meat long enough.”
“Please make sure that she is getting along with her new friends.”
“Please make sure that we leave on time.”
“Please make sure you record our favorite TV show.”
“Please make sure that you don’t stay out too late.”

Here’s to + (noun)
‘Here’s to’ is used in a way of celebrating or identifying a person, place, or thing of significance. It is usually said while toasting someone at dinner, or signaling to someone or something after an event.

Here are some examples:

“Here’s to the winner!”
“Here’s to your marriage!”
“Here’s to the New Year!”
“Here’s to great friends!”
“Here’s to starting a new job!”
“Here is to the luckiest guy in the world!”
“Here is to you!”
“Here is to happiness!”
“Here is to a wonderful day!”
“Here is to great memories!”

It’s no use + (verb-ing)
‘It’s’ is a contraction for ‘it is.’ By stating ‘it’s no use’ you are saying that what you or someone else is doing is not recommended or uncalled for.

Here are some examples:

“It’s no use crying.”
“It’s no use separating them.”
“It’s no use talking to her.”
“It’s no use whining about it.”
“It’s no use apologizing.”
“It’s no use attempting to please him.”
“It’s no use arguing about it.”
“It’s no use behaving that way.”
“It’s no use cleaning up.”
“It’s no use checking on it yet.”

There’s no way + (subject + verb)
‘There’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘there is.’ By stating ‘there’s no way’ you are relaying a thought of doubt about an event taking place now or in the future.

Here are some examples:

“There’s no way you finish on time.”
“There’s no way we complete on time.”
“There’s no way your mother approves.”
“There’s no way no one claims it.”
“There’s no way they expect it.”
“There’s no way he can fix it.”
“There’s no way he can handle the news.”
“There’s no way your brother injured his ankle.”
“There is no way that horse jumps it.”
“There is no way he missed it.”

It’s very kind of you to + (verb)
When saying it is ‘kind of you’ you are saying that what someone has done or said was very appreciated or welcomed.

Here are some examples:

“It’s very kind of you to offer me the job.”
“It’s very kind of you to listen to me.”
“It’s very kind of you to join me.”
“It’s very kind of you to invite us.”
“It’s very kind of you to inform us what happened.”
“It is kind of you to help us.”
“It is kind of you to fill me in.”
“It is kind of you to entertain us.”
“It is kind of you to double my salary.”
“It is kind of you to decorate for the party.”

There’s nothing + (subject) + can + (verb)
‘There’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘there is.’ When using the word ‘nothing’ you are suggesting that something cannot happen or be done.

Here are some examples:

“There’s nothing you can harm.”
“There’s nothing the police can identify.”
“There’s nothing we can agree on.”
“There’s nothing we can join.”
“There’s nothing she can cook.”
“There’s nothing my dog can learn.”

By using the word ‘can’ or ‘can’t’ you change the expression to mean that all is possible.

Here are some examples:

“There is nothing I cannot ask for.”
“There’s nothing we cannot accomplish.”
“There’s nothing our dog cannot open.”
“There’s nothing that truck cannot move

Rumor has it that + (subject + verb)
‘Rumor has it’ is an expression used when suggesting you might have heard something or read about something that is taking place now or in the future. A rumor is not a fact.

Here are some examples:

“Rumor has it that that player will get traded.”
“Rumor has it that she cheated on him.”
“Rumor has it that they are going to get married.”
“Rumor has it that you like to paint.”
“Rumor has it that show is going to end.”
“Rumor has it that he is going to get a raise.”
“Rumor has it that your sister got in trouble.”
“Rumor has it that she goes to our gym.”
“Rumor has it that he will not return.”
“Rumor has it that it happened while texting.”

5 Speaking Rules you need to know(In brief)
1. Don’t study grammar too much
This rule might sound strange to many ESL students, but it is one of the most important rules. If you want to pass examinations, then study grammar. However, if you want to become fluent in English, then you should try to learn English without studying the grammar.

Studying grammar will only slow you down and confuse you. You will think about the rules when creating sentences instead of naturally saying a sentence like a native. Remember that only a small fraction of English speakers know more than 20% of all the grammar rules. Many ESL students know more grammar than native speakers. I can confidently say this with experience. I am a native English speaker, majored in English Literature, and have been teaching English for more than 10 years. However, many of my students know more details about English grammar than I do. I can easily look up the definition and apply it, but I don’t know it off the top of my head.

I often ask my native English friends some grammar questions, and only a few of them know the correct answer. However, they are fluent in English and can read, speak, listen, and communicate effectively.

Do you want to be able to recite the definition of a causative verb, or do you want to be able to speak English fluently?

2. Learn and study phrases
Many students learn vocabulary and try to put many words together to create a proper sentence. It amazes me how many words some of my students know, but they cannot create a proper sentence. The reason is because they didn’t study phrases. When children learn a language, they learn both words and phrases together. Likewise, you need to study and learn phrases.

If you know 1000 words, you might not be able to say one correct sentence. But if you know 1 phrase, you can make hundreds of correct sentences. If you know 100 phrases, you will be surprised at how many correct sentences you will be able to say. Finally, when you know only a 1000 phrases, you will be almost a fluent English speaker.

Don’t translate

When you want to create an English sentence, do not translate the words from your Mother tongue. The order of words is probably completely different and you will be both slow and incorrect by doing this. Instead, learn phrases and sentences so you don’t have to think about the words you are saying. It should be automatic.

Another problem with translating is that you will be trying to incorporate grammar rules that you have learned. Translating and thinking about the grammar to create English sentences is incorrect and should be avoided.
3. Reading and Listening is NOT enough. Practice Speaking what you hear!
Reading, listening, and speaking are the most important aspects of any language. The same is true for English. However, speaking is the only requirement to be fluent. It is normal for babies and children to learn speaking first, become fluent, then start reading, then writing. So the natural order is listening, speaking, reading, then writing.

First Problem
Isn’t it strange that schools across the world teach reading first, then writing, then listening, and finally speaking? Although it is different, the main reason is because when you learn a second language, you need to read material to understand and learn it. So even though the natural order is listening, speaking, reading, then writing, the order for ESL students is reading, listening, speaking, then writing.

Second Problem
The reason many people can read and listen is because that’s all they practice. But in order to speak English fluently, you need to practice speaking. Don’t stop at the listening portion, and when you study, don’t just listen. Speak out loud the material you are listening to and practice what you hear. Practice speaking out loud until your mouth and brain can do it without any effort. By doing so, you will be able to speak English fluently.
4. Submerge yourself
Being able to speak a language is not related to how smart you are. Anyone can learn how to speak any language. This is a proven fact by everyone in the world. Everyone can speak at least one language. Whether you are intelligent, or lacking some brain power, you are able to speak one language.

This was achieved by being around that language at all times. In your country, you hear and speak your language constantly. You will notice that many people who are good English speakers are the ones who studied in an English speaking school. They can speak English not because they went to an English speaking school, but because they had an environment where they can be around English speaking people constantly.

There are also some people who study abroad and learn very little. That is because they went to an English speaking school, but found friends from their own country and didn’t practice English.

You don’t have to go anywhere to become a fluent English speaker. You only need to surround yourself with English. You can do this by making rules with your existing friends that you will only speak English. You can also carry around an iPod and constantly listen to English sentences. As you can see, you can achieve results by changing what your surroundings are. Submerge yourself in English and you will learn several times faster.

5. Study correct material
A common phrase that is incorrect is, “Practice makes perfect.” This is far from the truth. Practice only makes what you are practicing permanent. If you practice the incorrect sentence, you will have perfected saying the sentence incorrectly. Therefore, it is important that you study material that is commonly used by most people.

Another problem I see is that many students study the news. However, the language they speak is more formal and the content they use is more political and not used in regular life. It is important to understand what they are saying, but this is more of an advanced lesson that should be studied after learning the fundamental basics of English.

Studying English with a friend who is not a native English speaker is both good and bad. You should be aware of the pros and cons of speaking with a non native speaking friend. Practicing with a non native person will give you practice. You can also motivate each other and point out basic mistakes. But you might pick up bad habits from one another if you are not sure about what are correct and incorrect sentences. So use these practice times as a time period to practice the correct material you studied. Not to learn how to say a sentence.

In short, study English material that you can trust, that is commonly used, and that is correct.

English Speaking Basics – Section I

English Speaking Basics is for English speaking beginners who need help to understand the basics of speaking English. We will use very simple phrases and expressions to help you with your English speaking.
I’m
‘I’m’ is an abbreviation for the word ‘I AM.’ It is used in combination with other words to tell someone about yourself or to describe something you are doing.

Here are some examples:

“I’m so tired.”
“I’m confused.”
“I’m happy.”
“I’m twenty three years old.”
“I’m hungry.”
“I’m nervous.”
“I’m excited.”
“I’m leaving work.”
“I’m thirsty.”
“I’m from Seattle.”

You can also add descriptive words with ‘I’m’ such as:

“I’m extremely tired.”
“I’m very happy.”
“I’m terribly hungry.”
“I am super excited.”
“I’m very nervous.”

I’m in/at/on
Describes an action you are doing.

Most commonly, you would use the word ‘in’ when entering a physical location such as a room or a building.

Here are some examples:

“I’m in the shower.”
“I’m in the lobby.”
“I’m in a car.”
“I’m in a house.”
“I’m in a school.”

Using the word ‘at’ helps tell someone where you currently are. The difference between ‘at’ and ‘in’ is that the physical location is general.

Here are some examples:

“I’m at the grocery.”
“I’m at the mall.”
“I’m at the doctor’s office.”
“I’m at the park.”
“I’m at the airport.”

However, in some cases you can use ‘at’ and ‘in’ interchangeably.

Here are some examples:

“I’m at the mall.”
“I’m in the mall.”
“I’m at the park.”
“I’m in the park.”
“I’m at the grocery.”
“I’m in the grocery.”

Using the word ‘on’ is referring to a non physical location such as your time being utilized by something else.

Here are some examples:

“I’m on the phone.”
“I’m on my computer.”
“I’m on a bus.”

I’m good at
Again, ‘I’m’ is used here as ‘I am.’ ‘Good at’ informs someone what you excel at and are comfortable doing.

Here are some examples:

“I’m good at drawing.”
“I’m good at video games.”
“I’m good at swimming.”
“I’m good at driving.”
“I’m good at reading.”
“I’m good at sports.”
“I’m good at writing.”
“I’m good at math.”
“I’m good at dancing.”
“I’m good at chess.”

I’m + (verb)
‘I’m’ is a contraction of the words ‘I am.’ By adding a verb to ‘I’m’ this lets you express an action or occurrence about yourself.

Here are some examples:

“I’m eating lunch.”
“I’m brushing my teeth.”
“I’m scared.”
“I’m driving to work.”
“I’m crying.”
“I’m typing an email.”
“I’m cooking dinner.”
“I’m combing my hair.”
“I’m hanging a picture.”
“I am texting.”
“I am dancing.”
“I am interested in the job.”
“I am exercising.”
“I am sad.”
“I am learning.”

I’m getting
When combining the words ‘I am’ and ‘getting’ you are telling someone ‘you’ are gaining possession, being affected by or have plans to seek out and obtain a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“I’m getting better.”
“I’m getting ready for bed.”
“I’m getting a tooth ache.”
“I’m getting a cold.”
“I’m getting married.”
“I’m getting tired.”
“I’m getting good at reading.”
“I’m getting a new car.”
“I’m getting a job.”
“I’m getting a puppy.”

I’m trying + (verb)
‘I am trying’ informs someone that you are attempting to accomplish something using bodily, mental, or spiritual strength. By adding a verb to ‘I’m trying’ you are pointing out exactly what it is you are attempting to do.

Here are some examples:

“I’m trying to get a job.”
“I’m trying to call my family.”
“I’m trying to enjoy my dinner.”
“I’m trying to educate myself.”
“I’m trying to explain myself.”
“I’m trying new food.”
“I’m trying to eat healthy.”
“I’m trying to understand.”

I’m gonna + (verb)
The word ‘gonna’ is incorrect grammatically. The equivalent in proper grammar would be ‘going to.’ When using the word ‘gonna’ you are telling someone what you are planning to do at that moment or in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“I’m gonna have some coffee.”
“I’m gonna go to work.”
“I’m gonna eat some cake.”
“I’m gonna send out my resume.”
“I’m gonna run a marathon.”
“I’m gonna ask her out for dinner.”
“I’m gonna stop smoking.”
“I’m gonna help my friends.”
“I’m gonna take swim lessons.”
“I’m gonna read a book.”

I have + (noun)
By using the words ‘I have’ you are informing someone of something you have possession of or have acquired.

Here are some examples:

“I have a cat.”
“I have a nice car.”
“I have a house.”
“I have a computer.”
“I have a headache.”

You may hear the words ‘cannot’ and ‘won’t’ used with ‘I have.’ By adding these you can express what you will not put up with or allow.

Here are some examples:

“I cannot have that behavior in my house.”
“I cannot have you over tonight.”
“I won’t have anything to do with that.”
“I won’t have it any other way.”

I have + (past participle)
Again, ‘I have’ shows possession or something acquired. By adding a past participle you are informing someone of a past or completed action done by you.

Here are some examples:

“I have done it.”
“I have heard that before.”
“I have driven a car.”
“I have forgotten the words.”
“I have read that book.”
“I have eaten at that restaurant before.”
“I have flown in an airplane.”
“I have forgiven you.”
“I have seen you before.”
“I have written a letter.”

I used to + (verb)

‘Used to’ expresses something that was done in the past, and is not usually done now.

Here are some examples:

“I used to develop websites.”
“I used to jog every day.”
“I used to paint.”
“I used to smoke.”
“I used to work from home.”
“I used to live in California.”
“I used to go to the beach every day.”
“I used to sing in a choir.”
“I used to like vegetables.”
“I used to start work at 6 o’clock.”

“I have to + (verb)
The words ‘have to’ describe something that needs to take place soon. It expresses certainty, necessity, or obligation.

Here are some examples:

“I have to switch schools.”
“I have to use the telephone.”
“I have to go to the bathroom.”
“I have to leave.”
“I have to unpack my bags.”

You can also add the word ‘don’t’ to suggest that someone is not required to do something.

“I don’t have to switch schools.”
“I don’t have to use the telephone.”
“I don’t have to go to the bathroom.”
“I don’t have to leave.”
“I don’t have to unpack my bags.”

I wanna + (verb)
The word ‘wanna’ is incorrect grammatically. It is equivalent to ‘want to.’ When combined with the word ‘I’ it helps communicate something you want to do.

Here are some examples:

“I wanna talk.”
“I wanna search for a job.”
“I wanna order some food.”
“I wanna marry her.”
“I wanna listen to that song.”

By adding the word ‘don’t’ you can change the meaning of what you are saying to something you ‘want’ to do to something you ‘do not’ want to do.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t wanna talk.”
“I don’t wanna search for a job.”
“I don’t wanna marry her.”
“I don’t wanna listen to that song.”
“I don’t wanna order some food.”

I gotta + (verb)
‘I gotta’ is grammatically incorrect. It is more of a spoken form. If you want to say this with proper grammar, the equivalent would be, ‘I have got to’ or ‘I’ve got to’. In the spoken form, ‘got to’ is shortened to ‘gotta’ and the word ‘have’ is dropped.

Here are some examples:

“I gotta manage my money.”
“I gotta obey the laws.”
“I gotta move to a bigger house.”
“I gotta impress my boss.”
“I gotta brush my teeth.”

By adding the word ‘have’ you can change what you are saying to express something that needs to be done in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“I have got to be on time to work.”
“I’ve gotta try harder at school.”
“I’ve gotta tell my wife I’ll be late.”
“I’ve gotta learn more about the laws.”
“I’ve gotta clean my house today.”

I would like to + (verb)
This sentence lets someone know what you would be interested in doing. This can be a physical, mental or verbal action.

Here are some examples:

“I would like to answer that question.”
“I would like to compete in a cooking contest.”
“I would like to explain myself.”
“I would like to invite you over.”
“I would like to practice.”
“I would like to become a doctor.”
“I would like to see you more often.”
“I would like to thank you.”
“I would like to learn about animals.”
“I would like to meet the Presiden

I plan to + (verb)
‘Plan to’ describes something that you would like to do in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“I plan to find a new apartment.”
“I plan to relax on vacation.”
“I plan to surprise my parents.”
“I plan to wash my car.”
“I plan to adopt a child.”
“I plan to impress my boss.”
“I plan to watch a movie.”
“I plan to save more money.”
“I plan to read a book.”
“I plan to learn new things.”

I’ve decided to + (verb)
‘I’ve’ is short for ‘I have’ and including the word ‘decided’ you are stating that you have made a decision or come to a conclusion.

Here are some examples:

“I’ve decided to accept the job.”
“I’ve decided to complete my degree.”
“I’ve decided to change my bad habits.”
“I’ve decided to extend my membership at the gym.”
“I’ve decided to form a chess club.”
“I’ve decided to hand over my responsibilities.”
“I’ve decided to help you move.”
“I’ve decided to interview for the job.”
“I’ve decided to increase my work load.”
“I’ve decided to manage a store.”

I was about to + (verb)
When stating ‘I was about to’ you are informing someone that you are going to be doing something at that moment or in the very near future.

Here are some examples:

“I was about to go out.”
“I was about to go to dinner.”
“I was about to go to bed.”
“I was about to go to work.”
“I was about to say the same thing.”
“I was about to call you.”
“I was about to send you an email.”
“I was about to mow my grass.”
“I was about to order us some drinks.”
“I was about to watch television.”

I didn’t mean to + (verb)
The word ‘didn’t’ is a contraction of the words ‘did not’. When using it in a sentence with the words ‘mean to’ you are informing someone that you did something you regret or are sorry for. This could have been a physical, mental or verbal action.

Here are some examples:

“I didn’t mean to hurt your feelings.”
“I didn’t mean to call you so late.”
“I didn’t mean to lie about what happened.”
“I didn’t mean to embarrass you.”
“I didn’t mean to stay out so late.”
“I did not mean to say those things.”
“I did not mean to leave you out.”
“I did not mean to make you confused.”
“I did not mean to think you were involved.”
“I did not mean to cause trouble.”

I don’t have time to + (verb)
The word ‘don’t’ is a contraction of the words ‘do not.’ When adding ‘have time to’ you are simply stating that you have other obligations and all other things considered must wait.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t have time to explain.”
“I don’t have time to eat.”
“I don’t have time to exercise.”
“I don’t have time to watch my favorite TV show.”
“I don’t have time to talk.”

You can also use the phrase ‘I don’t’ to express things you do not like, things you do not understand, or things you do not do.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t eat meat.”
“I don’t like the rain.”
“I don’t understand Spanish.”
“I do not understand what you are saying.”
“I do not like scary movies.”
“I do not like sports.”

I promise not to + (verb)
When using the word ‘promise’ you are giving your word that what you are saying is true. You might also be assuring someone a guarantee that you will follow thru on what you are saying to them.

When using ‘promise not to’ you are stating you will not do a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“I promise not to tell.”
“I promise not to leave without you.”
“I promise not to be so late.”
“I promise not to hurt your feelings.”
“I promise not to wake you up.”

You can also just use the word ‘promise’ to assure someone of your intentions.

Here are some examples:

“I promise I am telling the truth.”
“I promise to practice my math.”
“I promise to call you.”
“I promise I will tell you.”
“I promise I will come to your party.”

I’d rather + (verb)
‘I’d’ is a contraction of the words ‘I had’ or ‘I would.’

When using it with the word ‘rather’ you are suggesting you would like to do or prefer one thing more than another.

Here are some examples:

“I’d rather talk about this later.”
“I’d like to eat at home than go get fast food.”
“I’d rather ski than snowboard.”
“I’d rather stay late than come in early tomorrow.”
“I’d rather handle the problem myself.”
“I had rather go home than stay out too late.”
“I had rather listen to my parents or get in trouble.”
“I would rather exercise than sit on the couch all day.”
“I would rather complete my task early.”
“I would rather know the answer.”

I feel like + (verb-ing)
Here you are expressing to someone something you would enjoy doing.

Here are some examples:

“I feel like going for a bike ride.”
“I feel like going to the beach.”
“I feel like having a snack.”
“I feel like talking.”
“I feel like dancing.”
“I feel like having friends over to my house.”
“I feel like watching TV.”

By adding ‘don’t’ or ‘do not’ you can change what you are saying to express something you would not enjoy or express a concern about something.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t feel like leaving yet.”
“I don’t feel like explaining.”
“I don’t feel like going to bed.”
“I do not feel comfortable talking about it.”
“I do not feel like we are going in the right direction.”

I can’t help + (verb-ing)
The word ‘can’t’ is contraction for ‘cannot.’ Combined with ‘help’ you are communicating something you are unable to control or having a hard time gaining a grasp for. This can be a physical or mental action.

Here are some examples:

“I can’t help thinking about it.”
“I can’t help shopping so much.”
“I can’t help working all the time.”
“I can’t help smiling when I see her.”
“I can’t help eating so much.”
“I can’t help loving you.”
“I can not help biting my nails when I am nervous.”
“I can not help smoking when I have been drinking.”
“I cannot help feeling so sad.”
“I cannot help remembering the things you did.”

I was busy + (verb-ing)
When using the word ‘was’, you are referring to something in a past tense, or something that happened before. Combining it with the word ‘busy’ you can express something that was occupying you in a past time.

Here are some examples:

“I was busy thinking.”
“I was busy working.”
“I was busy cooking dinner.”
“I was busy talking on the phone.”
“I was busy cleaning the house.”
“I was busy studying for my test.”
“I was busy thinking of ideas for our website.”
“I was busy entertaining our neighbors.”
“I was busy completing my housework.”
“I was busy learning new things.”

By changing ‘was’ to ‘am’ you change your message from past tense to present tense and refer to something you are doing ‘now.’

Here are some examples:

“I am busy working.”
“I am busy cooking dinner.”
“I am busy studying for my test.”
“I am busy completing housework.”
“I am busy talking on the phone.”

I’m not used to + (verb-ing)
Here you are using ‘not used to’ to inform someone that you are unfamiliar or uncomfortable with a topic at hand.

Here are some examples:

“I’m not used to talking English.”
“I’m not used to studying so much.”
“I’m not used to being around new people.”
“I’m not used to talking in front of groups of people.”
“I’m not used to having so much stress.”
“I’m not used to traveling so much.”
“I’m not used to working so early.”
“I’m not used to having so much responsibility.”
“I’m not used to drinking so much.”

I want you to + (verb)
‘I want you to’ is telling someone that you have a desire or would like for them to do something.

Here are some examples:

“I want you to clean the dishes.”
“I want you to come home right after school.”
“I want you to call once you get there.”
“I want you to explain yourself to me.”
“I want you to educate me.”

By using the word ‘need’ instead of ‘want’ you are expressing something that is required or wanted.

Here are some examples:

“I need you to study harder in school.”
“I need you to stop and listen to me.”
“I need you to greet our guests.”
“I need you to introduce me to your family.”
“I need to request a refund.”

I’m here to + (verb)
You are informing someone that you are at a particular place to accomplish something.

Here are some examples:

“I’m here to apply for the job.”
“I’m here to take a test.”
“I’m here to receive my gift.”
“I’m here to support all your decisions.”
“I’m here to watch a movie.”
“I’m here to work on your computer.”
“I’m here to welcome you to the neighborhood.”
“I’m here to raise awareness for cancer.”
“I’m here to start the job.”
“I’m here to receive the award.”

I have something + (verb)
When using the expression ‘I have something’ you are communicating that you possess something or need to do something that is unspecified or undetermined.

Here are some examples:

“I have something to complete.”
“I have something to share with you.”
“I have something important to tell you.”
“I have something to encourage you.”
“I have something to explain to you.”
“I have something special planned for your birthday.”
“I have something else to consider.”
“I have something to apologize about.”
“I have something to attend tonight.”
“I have something to ask you.”
“I have something fun for us to do.”

I’m looking forward to
When telling someone that you are ‘looking forward to’ you are saying that you are waiting or hoping for something, especially with pleasure.

Here are some examples:

“I’m looking forward to meeting you.”
“I’m looking forward to talking with you.”
“I’m looking forward to going on vacation.”
“I’m looking forward to spending time with my family.”
“I’m looking forward to learning the English language.”
“I am looking forward to visiting another country.”
“I am looking forward to having a family.”
“I am looking forward to graduating from college.”
“I am looking forward to watching the baseball game.”
“I am looking forward to running in a race.”

English Speaking Basics – Section II

English Speaking Basics II is for English speaking beginners who need help to understand the basics of speaking English. We will use very simple phrases and expressions to help you with your English speaking.

This second section contains the next 30 lessons. If any lessons are too easy, please move forward to other lessons.

I’m calling to + (verb)
When using the words ‘I’m calling’ you are stating that you are actually using the phone to call and relay information.

Here are some examples:

“I’m calling to tell you about my day.”
“I’m calling to accept your invitation.”
“I’m calling to answer your question.”
“I’m calling to book a reservation at your restaurant.”
“I’m calling to complain about something.”
“I’m calling to thank you.”
“I’m calling to support your decision.”
“I’m calling to remind you of our dinner plans.”
“I’m calling to report a lost wallet.”
“I’m calling to receive my prize.”

I’m working on + (noun)
‘I’m’ is a contraction for the words ‘I am.’ The phrase ‘working on’ relays a physical or mental effort towards an accomplishment.

Here are some examples:

“I’m working on a big project.”
“I’m working on training my dog.”
“I’m working on making new friends.”
“I’m working on educating myself.”
“I’m working on my homework.”
“I am working on painting a house.”
“I am working on a new idea.”
“I am working on my computer.”
“I’m working on my website.”

I’m sorry to + (verb)
Saying you are ‘sorry to’ expresses a feeling of sympathy or regret.

Here are some examples:

“I’m sorry to be so late.”
“I’m sorry to hear about your sick mother.”
“I’m sorry to waste your time.”
“I’m sorry to make you feel so sad.”
“I’m sorry to frighten you.”
“I’m sorry to disagree with your decision.”
“I’m sorry to call so late.”
“I’m sorry to admit what I did.”
“I’m sorry to end this relationship.”

I’m thinking of + (verb-ing)
‘Thinking’ refers to a process of thought, forming an opinion or judgment. When expressing ‘I am thinking of’ you are letting someone know what you are personally thinking.

Here are some examples:

“I’m thinking of checking out the new movie.”
“I’m thinking of filming my vacation.”
“I’m thinking of following a healthy diet.”
“I’m thinking of handing out flyers describing our business.”
“I’m thinking of increasing my work load.”
“I am thinking of introducing myself to him.”
“I am thinking of launching a new website.”
“I am thinking of moving to a new city.”
“I am thinking of offering her the position.”
“I am thinking of opening up a store.”

I’ll help you + (verb)
This lets you inform someone that you are willing to provide assistance. This could refer to something physical or mental, like helping someone to ‘think’ or ‘remember’ something.

Here are some examples:

“I’ll help you cook dinner tonight.”
“I’ll help you raise money for your charity.”
“I’ll help you register for your class online.”
“I’ll help you move to your new house.”
“I’ll help you prevent that from happening again.”
“I will help you park your car.”
“I will help you provide all the information you need.”
“I will help you realize your potential.”
“I will help you stop smoking.”
“I will help you shop for groceries.”

I’m dying to + (verb)
When using the word ‘dying’ in this manner you are referring to wanting or desiring something greatly.

Here are some examples:

“I’m dying to relax on the beach.”
“I’m dying to pick some fresh fruit.”
“I’m dying to order some desserts.”
“I’m dying to find out if I got the job.”
“I’m dying to move to a bigger house.”
“I’m dying to look at all the work you’ve done.”
“I’m dying to learn more about you.”
“I’m dying to introduce you to my parents.”
“I’m dying to expand my business.”
“I’m dying to check my score on the test.”

It’s my turn to + (verb)
The word ‘It’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘it is.’ When stating ‘my turn’ you are telling someone that it is time to change position or position focuses on to you.

Here are some examples:

“It’s my turn to walk you home.”
“It’s my turn to do laundry.”
“It’s my turn to work late.”
“It’s my turn to take out the trash.”
“It’s my turn to choose where we eat.”
“It is my turn to pay for dinner.”
“It is my turn to roll the dice.”
“It is my turn to provide an answer.”
“It is my turn to try and play the game.”
“It is my turn to attempt solving the problem.”

It’s hard for me to + (verb)
When saying that something is ‘hard for me’ you are informing someone that what you are talking about is difficult or challenging for you.

Here are some examples:

“It’s hard for me to accept what you are telling me.”
“It’s hard for me to argue your point.”
“It’s hard for me to balance my check book.”
“It’s hard for me to concentrate on the task.”
“It’s hard for me to consider your other options.”
“It’s hard for me to depend on you.”
“It is hard for me to decide where to go tonight.”
“It is hard for me to explain my actions.”
“It is hard for me to guarantee your success.”
“It is hard for me to handle so much pressure.”

I’m having a hard time + (verb-ing)
By stating you are having a hard time you are letting someone know you are having difficulty with something. This could be something physical or mental and something that could be overcome with effort.

Here are some examples:

“I’m having a hard time writing.”
“I’m having a hard time understanding you.”
“I’m having a hard time answering your question.”
“I’m having a hard time downloading songs to my iPod.”
“I’m having a hard time agreeing to the terms.”

With the addition of a verb you can express in more detail just how difficult something is for you.

Here are some examples:

“I’m having an extremely hard time trusting you.”
“I’m having an extremely hard time with my wife.”
“I’m having a very hard time finding a job.”
“I’m having a very hard time finding parts for my car.”

I think I should + (verb)
Here you are telling someone that you feel strongly about doing a particular action. Here are some examples:

“I think I should practice my reading.”
“I think I should join a study group.”
“I think I should handle this as soon as possible.”
“I think I should earn my degree.”
“I think I should explain myself.”

By adding the word ‘don’t’ you have changed what you are conveying from something you are thinking of doing, to something you are against.

Here are some examples:

“I do not think I should complain so much.”
“I do not think I should attend that event.”
“I do not think I should borrow more money.”
“I do not think I should doubt you.”
“I do not think I should decide until later.”

I’ve heard that + (subject + verb)
You are letting someone know that you are aware of something or that you have been informed of something that is taking place. This could be something that has already happened or something happening in the near future. ‘I’ve’ is a contraction of the words ‘I have.’

Here are some examples:

“I’ve heard that you got a new job.”
“I’ve heard that you want to leave your job.”
“I’ve heard that you got a new car.”
“I’ve heard that you like to jog.”
“I’ve heard that you fix computers.”
“I’ve heard that you’ve never been to Canada.”
“I’ve heard that you like to shop.”
“I’ve heard that you and your boss don’t get along.”
“I’ve heard that there is no school next week.”
“I’ve heard that your wife is a yoga instructor.”

It occurred to me that (subject + verb)
The word ‘occurred’ informs someone that something has come to mind or has been found. You are letting someone know that you suddenly have thought or remembered about something.

Here are some examples:

“It occurred to me that I forgot your birthday.”
“It occurred to me that we both belong to the same gym.”
“It occurred to me that we enjoy a lot of the same things.”
“It occurred to me the price for homes are more expensive here.”
“It occurred to me that eating healthy makes me feel better.”

Using the word ‘had’ or ‘has’ can change what you are saying to represent something remembered in a past time.

Here are some examples:

“It had occurred to me that I forgot something at the grocery.”
“It had occurred to me I might need to change my email address.”
“It has occurred to me I forgot my mom’s birthday.”
“It has occurred to me before.”

Let me + (verb)
‘Let me’ is suggesting that you are asking for permission or an opportunity to do something.

Here are some examples:

“Let me make my own decisions.”
“Let me offer to help you.”
“Let me open the door for you.”
“Let me pause and think about what we are doing.”
“Let me welcome you to the neighborhood.”
“Let me save you the trouble.”
“Let me make a suggestion.”
“Let me try and fix your car.”
“Let me taste the soup before you add more spices.”
“Let me treat you to some ice cream.”

Thank you for
Saying ‘thank you’ is telling someone you appreciate what they have done. This can either be something they did for you or for someone else.

Here are some examples:

“Thank you for inviting me.”
“Thank you for helping me move.”
“Thank you for informing me about the job opening.”
“Thank you for mailing that package for me.”
“Thank you for working so hard.”
“Thank you for stopping by to visit.”
“Thank you for replying to my email.”
“Thank you for providing me with the answers.”
“Thank you for heating up dinner.”
“Thank you for hurrying to get here.”

Can I + (verb)
When ending a sentence with a question mark (?) you are asking the person or people you are talking to a question for which you would like an answer. Here you are asking permission to do a particular action.

Here are some examples:

“Can I answer your question?”
“Can I attend the event?”
“Can I move to another spot?”
“Can I call you tomorrow?”
“Can I complete this later?”
“Can I explain myself?”
“Can I help you with your homework?”
“Can I include you in our plans?”
“Can I introduce you to my co-workers?”
“Can I inform you of some bad news?”

Can I get + (noun)
The phrase ‘Can I get’ can be used in a couple different ways. You can use it to ask a question.

Here are some examples:

“Can I get a cup of water?”
“Can I get a dog?”
“Can I get lunch?”
“Can I get sugar in my coffee?”
“Can I get popcorn at the movie?”

You can also use it when offering to help someone or do something for them.

Here are some examples:

“Can I get you another drink?”
“Can I help you move that?”
“Can I recommend a good place to eat?”
“Can I take you home?”
“Can I help you finish your project?”

I’m not sure if (subject + verb)
‘I’m not sure’ expresses a feeling of uncertainty or lack of confidence on a particular matter.

Here are some examples:

“I am not sure if they will offer me the job.”
“I’m not sure if she’ll return my call.”
“I’m not sure if my wife will understand.”
“I’m not sure if we will go out tonight.”
“I’m not sure if I understand your question.”
“I am not sure if I can handle it.”
“I am not sure if it will happen.”
“I am not sure if it will matter.”
“I am not sure if my mom will notice.”
“I am not sure if they will permit us to park there.”

Do you mind if I + (verb)
You are asking someone in present tense if they object to something you are asking.

Here are some examples:

“Do you mind if I excuse myself?”
“Do you mind if we left early?”
“Do you mind if I take a nap?”
“Do you mind if I ask your mom?”
“Do you mind if it snows?”

You could also use the word ‘would’

Here are some examples:

“Would you mind if we went out to eat?”
“Would you mind if I opened the window?”
“Would you mind telling me what you’re doing?”
“Would you mind being quiet for a minute?”
“Would you mind if I changed the channel?”

I don’t know what to + (verb)
You are letting someone know that you are not sure about what is being asked. You may also have no knowledge or opinion on a topic.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t know what to eat for dinner.”
“I don’t know what to buy you for your birthday.”
“I don’t know what to say.”
“I don’t know what to do with my spare time.”
“I don’t know what to do for vacation.”
“I do not know what to do to make you happy.”
“I do not know what to do to help you understand.”
“I do not know what to think.”
“I do not know what to do to prevent this.”
“I do not know what to order.”

I should have + (past participle)
‘Should’ is the past tense of the word ‘shall.’ When using the words ‘should have’ you are talking about something in the past that you ‘ought to’ or ‘might have’ done.

Here are some examples:

“I should have gone with you.”
“I should have studied more for my test.”
“I should have read the directions before starting.”
“I should have eaten breakfast this morning.”
“I should have listened to your advice.”
“I should have married her when I had the chance.”

‘Shall’ is something that will take place or exist in the future.

Here are some examples:

“I shall leave tomorrow.”
“I shall finish the job next week.”
“I shall see it tomorrow.”
“I shall go outside if it’s nice out.”
“I shall pay for this later.”

I wish I could + (verb)
You are expressing a desire to do something.

Here are some examples:

“I wish I could sing better.”
“I wish I could settle the argument.”
“I wish I could sail around the world.”
“I wish I could remain calm during all of this.”
“I wish I could remember his name.”
“I wish I could replace my old car with a new one.”
“I wish I could play outside.”
“I wish I could go to the game with you.”
“I wish I could write better.”
“I wish I could own my own business.”

You should + (verb)
Here you are suggesting an obligation or duty that needs to take place either now or in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“You should go to bed.”
“You should do your homework before going outside.”
“You should replace you headlights on your car.”
“You should request a raise at work.”
“You should stop smoking.”
“You should smile more.”
“You should slow down when driving in a neighborhood.”
“You should talk to him about it.”
“You should train your dog.”
“You should trust what they say.”

You’re supposed to + (verb)
‘You’re’ is a contraction of the words ‘you are.’ When using ‘You’re’ with the words ‘supposed to’ you are making a suggestion that something you strongly believe ought to happen.

Here are some examples:

“You’re supposed to keep that secret.”
“You’re supposed to let me know when you leave.”
“You’re supposed to stop when at a red light.”
“You’re supposed to unpack once you get there.”
“You’re supposed to return the movies you rent on time.”
“You are supposed to remain calm.”
“You are supposed to fasten your seat belt.”
“You are supposed to invite all your friends.”
“You are supposed to encourage one another.”
“You are supposed to decide before next Thursday.”

You seem + (adjective)
When stating ‘you seem’ you’re referring to the person you are talking to and expressing that they are giving the impression of or appear to be.

Here are some examples:

“You seem bored.”
“You seem unhappy with the results.”
“You seem eager to begin.”
“You seem easy to get along with.”
“You seem elated to hear the good news.”
“You seem deeply in love.”
“You seem afraid of roller coasters.”
“You seem confused about the rules of the game.”
“You seem embarrassed about what happened.”
“You seem decisive about your choice.”

You’d better + (verb)
‘You’d’ is a contraction of ‘you had’ or ‘you would.’ You are making a suggestion to someone for a particular action.

Here are some examples:

“You’d better exercise.”
“You’d better help out.”
“You’d better invite your brother.”
“You’d better impress the judges.”
“You’d better listen to your parents.”
“You had better not come home late.”
“You had better hope for the best.”
“You had better change your attitude.”
“You would be good at teaching.”
“You would do well at math.”

Are you into + (noun)
Here you are asking a question about an interest they might have or something they might enjoy doing.

Here are some examples:

“Are you into soccer?”
“Are you into trying new things?”
“Are you into wine tasting?”
“Are you into working out at home or at the gym?”
“Are you into scary movies?”
“Are you into playing games?”
“Are you into jogging?”
“Are you into painting?”
“Are you into traveling?”
“Are you into fixing cars?”

Are you trying to + (verb)
You are asking someone if they are attempting to do something. This can be something mentally or physically.

Here are some examples:

“Are you trying to ignore me?”
“Are you trying to manage your money?”
“Are you trying to memorize that song?”
“Are you trying to offer your help?”
“Are you trying to program your new phone?”
“Are you trying to pretend like it never happened?”
“Are you trying to remain calm?”
“Are you trying to remember her name?”
“Are you trying to reflect on the past?”
“Are you trying to switch flights?”

Please + (verb)
‘Please’ is generally used in a polite request when asking someone to do something.

Here are some examples:

“Please pass me the salt.”
“Please order me the steak and potatoes.”
“Please stop bothering me.”
“Please wash your hands before dinner.”
“Please wait outside until we are ready.”
“Please zip up your coat before you go outside.”
“Please stand back.”

The word ‘please’ can also mean to give enjoyment or satisfaction to.

Here are some examples:

“The smell of the flowers was very pleasing.”
“May it please the court to admit this into evidence?”
“I was very pleased with how the children behaved in class.”
“You cannot please everyone all the time.”
“She was pleased with the dress.”

Don’t + (verb)
The word ‘don’t’ is a contraction of the words ‘do not.’ It is said to convey a message of what NOT should be done.

Here are some examples:

“Don’t try and fool me.”
“Don’t allow this to happen.”
“Don’t watch scary movies before you go to bed.”
“Don’t cause any more trouble.”
“Don’t chew gum in class.”
“Do not concern yourself with other people’s problems.”
“Do not behave that way.”
“Do not announce your decision until you’re ready.”
“Do not argue with me.”
“Do not arrive late for your meeting.

Do you like
With this question you are asking someone what they prefer or enjoy.

Here are some examples:

“Do you like traveling on a plane?”
“Do you like watching baseball on TV?”
“Do you like skiing or snowboarding?”
“Do you like going to bed early?”
“Do you like spending time with me?”
“Do you like repeating the class?”
“Do you like playing video games?”
“Do you like listening to music?”
“Do you like practicing playing the piano?”
“Do you like jogging with me?”

How often do you
When asking this question you are inquiring how often or how frequent someone does a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“How often do you exercise?”
“How often do you change your password?”
“How often do you help out at school?”
“How often do you listen to your MP3 player?”
“How often do you need to go to the dentist?”
“How often do you receive your magazine in the mail?”
“How often do you report to your supervisor?”
“How often do you stretch before working out?”
“How often do you talk to your parents?”
“How often do you travel?”

Do you want me to + (verb)
To ‘want’ is to feel or have a desire for. When saying ‘Do you want me to’ you’re asking someone if there is anything you can do for them or assist them with.

Here are some examples:

“Do you want me to pick up the kids?”
“Do you want me to fix your flat tire?”
“Do you want me to help you read that book?”
“Do you want me to remind you?”
“Do you want me to remove my shoes?”

The word ‘want’ can also be used to express something YOU would like someone else to do or that something you personally would enjoy.

Here are some examples:

“I want you to come over.”
“I want you to make a decision.”
“I want you to water the flowers.”
“I want to understand what you are trying to say.”
“I want to be better at swimming.”
“I want to be more involved at church.”

What do you think about (verb-ing)
This question asks someone their opinion about a topic.

Here are some examples:

“What do you think about having a cup of tea with me?”
“What do you think about working overtime next week?”
“What do you think about waiting in line for tickets?”
“What do you think about sailing?”
“What do you think about staying here another night?”
“What do you think about retiring from your job?”
“What do you think about planting new trees in the backyard?”
“What do you think about offering to babysit?”
“What do you think about living in a new city?”
“What do you think about filming our vacation?”

Why don’t we + (verb)
‘Don’t’ is a contraction of ‘do not.’ When using ‘why’ you are asking a question that involves yourself and the person you are talking to.

Here are some examples:

“Why don’t we go bowling tonight?”
“Why don’t we pick some fresh flowers?”
“Why don’t we play a game of chess?”
“Why don’t we save more money?”
“Why don’t we remember this place?”
“Why don’t we test this before using it?”
“Why don’t we try and do it again?”
“Why don’t we post our results online?”
“Why don’t we gather more firewood?”
“Why don’t we earn more money?”

It’s too bad that
‘Too bad’ means regrettable or unfortunate. When using it in a sentence you are expressing a concern or regret for what has taken place. The topic being discussed could have happened to you, the person you are talking to, or someone or something else.

Here are some examples:

“It’s too bad that she lost her job.”
“It’s too bad that you have to go.”
“It’s too bad that I found out about it.”
“It’s too bad we will not be there on time.”
“It’s too bad that tickets are all gone to that concert.”
“It’s too bad that it is supposed to rain.”
“It’s too bad that she got hurt.”
“It’s too bad that my work has to lay off people.”
“It’s too bad that you do not understand.”

You could have + (past participle)
Using ‘could have’ you are speaking about something that was, should be or would be. You are stating that they had other options that could have been chosen.

Here are some examples:

“You could have completed it sooner.”
“You could have blown your chance.”
“You could have done better on your exam.”
“You could have given me more time to get ready.”
“You could have heard that from someone else.”
“You could have sent that package first class.”
“You could have slept in a little longer.”
“You could have written him a letter.”
“You could have thought of something to do.”
“You could have upset her by saying that.” If I were you, I would + (verb)
Here you are giving an example of what decision YOU would do given the circumstances. This can be in past tense or in a conditional present.

Here are some examples:

“If I were you, I would enjoy my vacation.”
“If I were you, I would explain what happened.”
“If I were you, I would continue working until it is done.”
“If I were you, I would book my reservations now.”
“If I were you, I would answer the question.”

By adding ‘have’ after the word ‘would’ you are talking about something in the past tense.

Here are some examples:

“If I were you, I would have enjoyed my vacation.”
“If I were you, I would have explained what happened.”
“If I were you, I would have continued working until it was done.”
“If I were you, I would have booked my reservations now.”
“If I were you, I would have answered the question.”

It’s gonna be + (adjective)
You’re informing someone what something is going to be like. This could be something you are going to do, see or feel.

Here are some examples:

“It’s going to be delicious.”
“It’s gonna be easy.”
“It’s gonna be depressing.”
“It’s going to be exciting.”
“It’s going to be disgusting.”

You can also add ‘he or she’ or a person’s name to describe how they might react to something.

Here are some examples:

“He is going to be tough to deal with.”
“He is going to be terrific at that.”
“She is going to be relieved to hear that.”
“She is going to be scared after watching that movie.”
“Sally is going to be successful.”

It looks like + (noun)
You could be describing how something is similar or appears to be by the way it looks.

Here are some examples:

“It looks like a balloon.”
“It looks like a jellyfish.”
“It looks like a banana.”
“It looks like a fish.”
You can also use ‘it looks like’ to describe something that might be in the future.

Here are some examples:

“It looks like it’s going to rain.”
“It looks like it’s going to be fun.”
“It looks like it’s going to be a long day.”

You can also use it to describe something in the present tense.

Here are some examples:

“It looks like they are leaving.”
“It looks like he is waving to us.”
“It looks like she is lost.”
“It looks like they are racing.”
That’s why + (subject + verb)
‘That’s’ is short for ‘that is.’ Here you are telling someone ‘because of this’ or ‘therefore.’

Here are some examples:

“That’s why people admire you.”
“That’s why she appears so happy.”
“That’s why babies crawl before they can walk.”
“That’s why Pam cries at sad movies.”
“That’s why you fail to understand.”
“That is why you help out people in need.”
“That is why you try and include everyone.”
“That is why you lock your doors when you leave home.”
“That is why she smiles when you walk by.”
“That is why you use it for emergencies.”

It’s time to + (verb)
You are letting someone know that something is required to be done at the present time.

Here are some examples:

“It’s time to say goodbye.”
“It’s time to ask for a raise.”
“It’s time to collect our money.”
“It’s time to cheer for our team.”
“It’s time to change the clocks.”
“It is time to decide what to do.”
“It is time to enjoy ourselves.”
“It is time to fill me in on what’s going on.”
“It is time to help out.”
“It is time to join a gym.”

The point is that + (subject + verb)
By stating ‘the point is’ you are stating in your opinion the meaning about what is actually happening.

Here are some examples:

“The point is that if you study you will do well in school.”
“The point is that she does not understand.”
“The point is that we need this done today.”
“The point is that the world would be a better place.”
“The point is that we should help.”
“The point is that snakes can be dangerous.”
“The point is that leaving a baby alone is not a good idea.”
“The point is that if we do not leave now we will be late.”
“The point is that she needs to be more responsible.”
“The point is that we need to work together.”

How was + (noun)
By using the words ‘how was’ you are asking someone a question about something that happened or something they did in the past.

Here are some examples:

“How was your meeting?”
“How was your doctor’s appointment?”
“How was the birthday party?”
“How was lunch?”
“How was the airplane ride?”
“How was vacation?”
“How were your parents?”
“How were roads when you drove home?”
“How were people acting after what happened?”
“How were holidays with the family?”

How about + (verb-ing)
You’re asking someone their opinion on something or if they would like to do something.

Here are some examples:

“How about singing?”
“How about hanging out tonight?”
“How about folding the laundry for me?”
“How about helping us out?”
“How about describing to me what happened?”
“How about exploring new ideas?”
“How about comparing prices before we buy it?”
“How about considering it?”
“How about following me to their house?”
“How about feeding the dogs?”

What if + (subject + verb)
Here you are asking a question about ‘in the event of’ or ‘in the event that.’ Usually you are looking for an answer at the time of the question that is being asked.

Here are some examples:

“What if I miss the bus?”
“What if I were late to dinner?”
“What if I called her tomorrow?”
“What if I don’t understand?”
“What if someone sees me?”
“What if no one is home?”
“What if they decide to stay?”
“What if it rains while we are camping?”
“What if I do not finish on time?”
“What if we introduce ourselves first?”

How much does it cost to + (verb)
You are simply asking how much you would need to pay to do something.

Here are some examples:

“How much does it cost to fly to Europe?”
“How much does it cost to own a house?”
“How much does it cost to play a round of golf?”
“How much does it cost to join a gym?”
“How much does it cost to repair my car?”
“How much would it cost to talk long distance?”
“How much would it cost to run a website?”
“How much would it cost to wash my car?”
“How much would it cost to rent a car?”
“How much would it cost to go to the movies?”

How come + (subject + verb)
When using ‘how come’ you are asking why a particular thing has or had to take place.

Here are some examples:

“How come parents worry so much?”
“How come people carpool to work?”
“How come you are so upset?”
“How come he will not call you?”
“How come you stayed out so late?”
“How come you cannot make a decision?”
“How come you always question me?”
“How come we never agree?”
“How come your dog digs in the yard?”
“How come she will not come over?”

What are the chances of + (verb-ing)
By asking ‘what are the chances of’ you are wondering how often or in what case would a particular thing happen.

Here are some examples:

“What are the chances of getting tickets?”
“What are the chances of that happening?”
“What are the chances of it raining today?”
“What are the chances of winning the lottery?”

When replacing the word ‘the’ with ‘your’ or ‘our’ you can ask what the chances ‘personally’ that the topic will happen.

Here are some examples:

“What are the chances of you staying home today?”
“What are your chances of getting the job?”
“What are your chances of improving?”
“What are your chances of moving?”
“What are our chances of staying together?”
“What are our chances of working together?”
“What are our chances of going together?”

There is something wrong with + (noun)
You are informing someone that there is something not right or out of the ordinary.

Here are some examples:

“There is something wrong with my laptop.”
“There is something wrong with my car.”
“There is something wrong with my cell phone.”
“There is something wrong with my head.”
“There is something wrong with your answering machine.”
“There is something wrong with your way of thinking.”
“There is something wrong with your attitude.”
“There is something wrong with your dog.”
“There is something wrong with our relationship.”
“There is something wrong with our alarm clock.”

Let’s not + (verb)
The word ‘let’s’ is formed from the words ‘let us.’ Here you are requesting that something not take place at this moment or that what is happening needs to be contained or lessened.

Here are some examples:

“Let’s not discuss this now.”
“Let’s not stay here too long.”
“Let’s not stop anywhere on the way.”
“Let’s not remain mad at each other.”
“Let’s not meddle in other people’s business.”
“Let us not get too excited.”
“Let us not worry too much.”
“Let us not interrupt them when they are talking.”
“Let us help you.”
“Let us get that for you.”

Let’s say that + (subject + verb)
‘Let’s’ is a contraction for ‘let us.’ You are suggesting to someone that you should both agree on what you will communicate to someone else.

Here are some examples:

“Let’s say that you love to fish.”
“Let’s say we found it.”
“Let’s say that we enjoy being with them.”
“Let’s say that we had a good time.”
“Let’s say that it’s hard to decide.”
“Let’s say that we have to go.”
“Let’s say that we can host.”
“Let’s say that I have to work.”
“Let’s say that the movie was really good.”

There’s no need to + (verb)
The word ‘there’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘there is’ or ‘there has.’ When expressing ‘no need’ you are stating that the action does not need to take place.

Here are some examples:

“There’s no need to worry.”
“There’s no need to be upset.”
“There’s no need to act so strange.”
“There’s no need to act so shy.”
“There’s no need to rush off.”
“There’s no need to talk now.”
“There is no need to call this late.”
“There is no need to bother him.”
“There is no need to run away.”
“There is no need to stop now.”

It takes + (time) + to + (verb)
You are letting someone know how long it will take to do a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“It takes one hour to get there.”
“It takes forty-five minutes for me to get ready.”
“It takes four quarters to complete a football game.”
“It takes 7 seconds for my car to go 60 miles per hour.”
“It takes all day for us to finish golfing.”
“It takes years to learn to play guitar.”
“It takes 15 minutes to get to downtown.”
“It takes me one hour to cook.”

Please make sure that + (subject + verb)
You are asking someone to make sure that a particular thing happens or takes place.

Here are some examples:

“Please make sure that she wakes up on time.”
“Please make sure that she gets to school.”
“Please make sure that dinner is ready when we get home.”
“Please make sure that your assignment is done.”
“Please make sure that the water is not too hot.”
“Please make sure you cook the meat long enough.”
“Please make sure that she is getting along with her new friends.”
“Please make sure that we leave on time.”
“Please make sure you record our favorite TV show.”
“Please make sure that you don’t stay out too late.”

Here’s to + (noun)
‘Here’s to’ is used in a way of celebrating or identifying a person, place, or thing of significance. It is usually said while toasting someone at dinner, or signaling to someone or something after an event.

Here are some examples:

“Here’s to the winner!”
“Here’s to your marriage!”
“Here’s to the New Year!”
“Here’s to great friends!”
“Here’s to starting a new job!”
“Here is to the luckiest guy in the world!”
“Here is to you!”
“Here is to happiness!”
“Here is to a wonderful day!”
“Here is to great memories!”

It’s no use + (verb-ing)
‘It’s’ is a contraction for ‘it is.’ By stating ‘it’s no use’ you are saying that what you or someone else is doing is not recommended or uncalled for.

Here are some examples:

“It’s no use crying.”
“It’s no use separating them.”
“It’s no use talking to her.”
“It’s no use whining about it.”
“It’s no use apologizing.”
“It’s no use attempting to please him.”
“It’s no use arguing about it.”
“It’s no use behaving that way.”
“It’s no use cleaning up.”
“It’s no use checking on it yet.”

There’s no way + (subject + verb)
‘There’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘there is.’ By stating ‘there’s no way’ you are relaying a thought of doubt about an event taking place now or in the future.

Here are some examples:

“There’s no way you finish on time.”
“There’s no way we complete on time.”
“There’s no way your mother approves.”
“There’s no way no one claims it.”
“There’s no way they expect it.”
“There’s no way he can fix it.”
“There’s no way he can handle the news.”
“There’s no way your brother injured his ankle.”
“There is no way that horse jumps it.”
“There is no way he missed it.”
It takes + (time) + to + (verb)
You are letting someone know how long it will take to do a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“It takes one hour to get there.”
“It takes forty-five minutes for me to get ready.”
“It takes four quarters to complete a football game.”
“It takes 7 seconds for my car to go 60 miles per hour.”
“It takes all day for us to finish golfing.”
“It takes years to learn to play guitar.”
“It takes 15 minutes to get to downtown.”
“It takes me one hour to cook.”

Please make sure that + (subject + verb)
You are asking someone to make sure that a particular thing happens or takes place.

Here are some examples:

“Please make sure that she wakes up on time.”
“Please make sure that she gets to school.”
“Please make sure that dinner is ready when we get home.”
“Please make sure that your assignment is done.”
“Please make sure that the water is not too hot.”
“Please make sure you cook the meat long enough.”
“Please make sure that she is getting along with her new friends.”
“Please make sure that we leave on time.”
“Please make sure you record our favorite TV show.”
“Please make sure that you don’t stay out too late.”

Here’s to + (noun)
‘Here’s to’ is used in a way of celebrating or identifying a person, place, or thing of significance. It is usually said while toasting someone at dinner, or signaling to someone or something after an event.

Here are some examples:

“Here’s to the winner!”
“Here’s to your marriage!”
“Here’s to the New Year!”
“Here’s to great friends!”
“Here’s to starting a new job!”
“Here is to the luckiest guy in the world!”
“Here is to you!”
“Here is to happiness!”
“Here is to a wonderful day!”
“Here is to great memories!”

It’s no use + (verb-ing)
‘It’s’ is a contraction for ‘it is.’ By stating ‘it’s no use’ you are saying that what you or someone else is doing is not recommended or uncalled for.

Here are some examples:

“It’s no use crying.”
“It’s no use separating them.”
“It’s no use talking to her.”
“It’s no use whining about it.”
“It’s no use apologizing.”
“It’s no use attempting to please him.”
“It’s no use arguing about it.”
“It’s no use behaving that way.”
“It’s no use cleaning up.”
“It’s no use checking on it yet.”

There’s no way + (subject + verb)
‘There’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘there is.’ By stating ‘there’s no way’ you are relaying a thought of doubt about an event taking place now or in the future.

Here are some examples:

“There’s no way you finish on time.”
“There’s no way we complete on time.”
“There’s no way your mother approves.”
“There’s no way no one claims it.”
“There’s no way they expect it.”
“There’s no way he can fix it.”
“There’s no way he can handle the news.”
“There’s no way your brother injured his ankle.”
“There is no way that horse jumps it.”
“There is no way he missed it.”

It’s very kind of you to + (verb)
When saying it is ‘kind of you’ you are saying that what someone has done or said was very appreciated or welcomed.

Here are some examples:

“It’s very kind of you to offer me the job.”
“It’s very kind of you to listen to me.”
“It’s very kind of you to join me.”
“It’s very kind of you to invite us.”
“It’s very kind of you to inform us what happened.”
“It is kind of you to help us.”
“It is kind of you to fill me in.”
“It is kind of you to entertain us.”
“It is kind of you to double my salary.”
“It is kind of you to decorate for the party.”

There’s nothing + (subject) + can + (verb)
‘There’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘there is.’ When using the word ‘nothing’ you are suggesting that something cannot happen or be done.

Here are some examples:

“There’s nothing you can harm.”
“There’s nothing the police can identify.”
“There’s nothing we can agree on.”
“There’s nothing we can join.”
“There’s nothing she can cook.”
“There’s nothing my dog can learn.”

By using the word ‘can’ or ‘can’t’ you change the expression to mean that all is possible.

Here are some examples:

“There is nothing I cannot ask for.”
“There’s nothing we cannot accomplish.”
“There’s nothing our dog cannot open.”
“There’s nothing that truck cannot move

Rumor has it that + (subject + verb)
‘Rumor has it’ is an expression used when suggesting you might have heard something or read about something that is taking place now or in the future. A rumor is not a fact.

Here are some examples:

“Rumor has it that that player will get traded.”
“Rumor has it that she cheated on him.”
“Rumor has it that they are going to get married.”
“Rumor has it that you like to paint.”
“Rumor has it that show is going to end.”
“Rumor has it that he is going to get a raise.”
“Rumor has it that your sister got in trouble.”
“Rumor has it that she goes to our gym.”
“Rumor has it that he will not return.”
“Rumor has it that it happened while texting.”

5 Speaking Rules you need to know(In brief)
1. Don’t study grammar too much
This rule might sound strange to many ESL students, but it is one of the most important rules. If you want to pass examinations, then study grammar. However, if you want to become fluent in English, then you should try to learn English without studying the grammar.

Studying grammar will only slow you down and confuse you. You will think about the rules when creating sentences instead of naturally saying a sentence like a native. Remember that only a small fraction of English speakers know more than 20% of all the grammar rules. Many ESL students know more grammar than native speakers. I can confidently say this with experience. I am a native English speaker, majored in English Literature, and have been teaching English for more than 10 years. However, many of my students know more details about English grammar than I do. I can easily look up the definition and apply it, but I don’t know it off the top of my head.

I often ask my native English friends some grammar questions, and only a few of them know the correct answer. However, they are fluent in English and can read, speak, listen, and communicate effectively.

Do you want to be able to recite the definition of a causative verb, or do you want to be able to speak English fluently?

2. Learn and study phrases
Many students learn vocabulary and try to put many words together to create a proper sentence. It amazes me how many words some of my students know, but they cannot create a proper sentence. The reason is because they didn’t study phrases. When children learn a language, they learn both words and phrases together. Likewise, you need to study and learn phrases.

If you know 1000 words, you might not be able to say one correct sentence. But if you know 1 phrase, you can make hundreds of correct sentences. If you know 100 phrases, you will be surprised at how many correct sentences you will be able to say. Finally, when you know only a 1000 phrases, you will be almost a fluent English speaker.

Don’t translate

When you want to create an English sentence, do not translate the words from your Mother tongue. The order of words is probably completely different and you will be both slow and incorrect by doing this. Instead, learn phrases and sentences so you don’t have to think about the words you are saying. It should be automatic.

Another problem with translating is that you will be trying to incorporate grammar rules that you have learned. Translating and thinking about the grammar to create English sentences is incorrect and should be avoided.
3. Reading and Listening is NOT enough. Practice Speaking what you hear!
Reading, listening, and speaking are the most important aspects of any language. The same is true for English. However, speaking is the only requirement to be fluent. It is normal for babies and children to learn speaking first, become fluent, then start reading, then writing. So the natural order is listening, speaking, reading, then writing.

First Problem
Isn’t it strange that schools across the world teach reading first, then writing, then listening, and finally speaking? Although it is different, the main reason is because when you learn a second language, you need to read material to understand and learn it. So even though the natural order is listening, speaking, reading, then writing, the order for ESL students is reading, listening, speaking, then writing.

Second Problem
The reason many people can read and listen is because that’s all they practice. But in order to speak English fluently, you need to practice speaking. Don’t stop at the listening portion, and when you study, don’t just listen. Speak out loud the material you are listening to and practice what you hear. Practice speaking out loud until your mouth and brain can do it without any effort. By doing so, you will be able to speak English fluently.
4. Submerge yourself
Being able to speak a language is not related to how smart you are. Anyone can learn how to speak any language. This is a proven fact by everyone in the world. Everyone can speak at least one language. Whether you are intelligent, or lacking some brain power, you are able to speak one language.

This was achieved by being around that language at all times. In your country, you hear and speak your language constantly. You will notice that many people who are good English speakers are the ones who studied in an English speaking school. They can speak English not because they went to an English speaking school, but because they had an environment where they can be around English speaking people constantly.

There are also some people who study abroad and learn very little. That is because they went to an English speaking school, but found friends from their own country and didn’t practice English.

You don’t have to go anywhere to become a fluent English speaker. You only need to surround yourself with English. You can do this by making rules with your existing friends that you will only speak English. You can also carry around an iPod and constantly listen to English sentences. As you can see, you can achieve results by changing what your surroundings are. Submerge yourself in English and you will learn several times faster.

5. Study correct material
A common phrase that is incorrect is, “Practice makes perfect.” This is far from the truth. Practice only makes what you are practicing permanent. If you practice the incorrect sentence, you will have perfected saying the sentence incorrectly. Therefore, it is important that you study material that is commonly used by most people.

Another problem I see is that many students study the news. However, the language they speak is more formal and the content they use is more political and not used in regular life. It is important to understand what they are saying, but this is more of an advanced lesson that should be studied after learning the fundamental basics of English.

Studying English with a friend who is not a native English speaker is both good and bad. You should be aware of the pros and cons of speaking with a non native speaking friend. Practicing with a non native person will give you practice. You can also motivate each other and point out basic mistakes. But you might pick up bad habits from one another if you are not sure about what are correct and incorrect sentences. So use these practice times as a time period to practice the correct material you studied. Not to learn how to say a sentence.

In short, study English material that you can trust, that is commonly used, and that is correct.

English Speaking Basics – Section I

English Speaking Basics is for English speaking beginners who need help to understand the basics of speaking English. We will use very simple phrases and expressions to help you with your English speaking.
I’m
‘I’m’ is an abbreviation for the word ‘I AM.’ It is used in combination with other words to tell someone about yourself or to describe something you are doing.

Here are some examples:

“I’m so tired.”
“I’m confused.”
“I’m happy.”
“I’m twenty three years old.”
“I’m hungry.”
“I’m nervous.”
“I’m excited.”
“I’m leaving work.”
“I’m thirsty.”
“I’m from Seattle.”

You can also add descriptive words with ‘I’m’ such as:

“I’m extremely tired.”
“I’m very happy.”
“I’m terribly hungry.”
“I am super excited.”
“I’m very nervous.”

I’m in/at/on
Describes an action you are doing.

Most commonly, you would use the word ‘in’ when entering a physical location such as a room or a building.

Here are some examples:

“I’m in the shower.”
“I’m in the lobby.”
“I’m in a car.”
“I’m in a house.”
“I’m in a school.”

Using the word ‘at’ helps tell someone where you currently are. The difference between ‘at’ and ‘in’ is that the physical location is general.

Here are some examples:

“I’m at the grocery.”
“I’m at the mall.”
“I’m at the doctor’s office.”
“I’m at the park.”
“I’m at the airport.”

However, in some cases you can use ‘at’ and ‘in’ interchangeably.

Here are some examples:

“I’m at the mall.”
“I’m in the mall.”
“I’m at the park.”
“I’m in the park.”
“I’m at the grocery.”
“I’m in the grocery.”

Using the word ‘on’ is referring to a non physical location such as your time being utilized by something else.

Here are some examples:

“I’m on the phone.”
“I’m on my computer.”
“I’m on a bus.”

I’m good at
Again, ‘I’m’ is used here as ‘I am.’ ‘Good at’ informs someone what you excel at and are comfortable doing.

Here are some examples:

“I’m good at drawing.”
“I’m good at video games.”
“I’m good at swimming.”
“I’m good at driving.”
“I’m good at reading.”
“I’m good at sports.”
“I’m good at writing.”
“I’m good at math.”
“I’m good at dancing.”
“I’m good at chess.”

I’m + (verb)
‘I’m’ is a contraction of the words ‘I am.’ By adding a verb to ‘I’m’ this lets you express an action or occurrence about yourself.

Here are some examples:

“I’m eating lunch.”
“I’m brushing my teeth.”
“I’m scared.”
“I’m driving to work.”
“I’m crying.”
“I’m typing an email.”
“I’m cooking dinner.”
“I’m combing my hair.”
“I’m hanging a picture.”
“I am texting.”
“I am dancing.”
“I am interested in the job.”
“I am exercising.”
“I am sad.”
“I am learning.”

I’m getting
When combining the words ‘I am’ and ‘getting’ you are telling someone ‘you’ are gaining possession, being affected by or have plans to seek out and obtain a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“I’m getting better.”
“I’m getting ready for bed.”
“I’m getting a tooth ache.”
“I’m getting a cold.”
“I’m getting married.”
“I’m getting tired.”
“I’m getting good at reading.”
“I’m getting a new car.”
“I’m getting a job.”
“I’m getting a puppy.”

I’m trying + (verb)
‘I am trying’ informs someone that you are attempting to accomplish something using bodily, mental, or spiritual strength. By adding a verb to ‘I’m trying’ you are pointing out exactly what it is you are attempting to do.

Here are some examples:

“I’m trying to get a job.”
“I’m trying to call my family.”
“I’m trying to enjoy my dinner.”
“I’m trying to educate myself.”
“I’m trying to explain myself.”
“I’m trying new food.”
“I’m trying to eat healthy.”
“I’m trying to understand.”

I’m gonna + (verb)
The word ‘gonna’ is incorrect grammatically. The equivalent in proper grammar would be ‘going to.’ When using the word ‘gonna’ you are telling someone what you are planning to do at that moment or in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“I’m gonna have some coffee.”
“I’m gonna go to work.”
“I’m gonna eat some cake.”
“I’m gonna send out my resume.”
“I’m gonna run a marathon.”
“I’m gonna ask her out for dinner.”
“I’m gonna stop smoking.”
“I’m gonna help my friends.”
“I’m gonna take swim lessons.”
“I’m gonna read a book.”

I have + (noun)
By using the words ‘I have’ you are informing someone of something you have possession of or have acquired.

Here are some examples:

“I have a cat.”
“I have a nice car.”
“I have a house.”
“I have a computer.”
“I have a headache.”

You may hear the words ‘cannot’ and ‘won’t’ used with ‘I have.’ By adding these you can express what you will not put up with or allow.

Here are some examples:

“I cannot have that behavior in my house.”
“I cannot have you over tonight.”
“I won’t have anything to do with that.”
“I won’t have it any other way.”

I have + (past participle)
Again, ‘I have’ shows possession or something acquired. By adding a past participle you are informing someone of a past or completed action done by you.

Here are some examples:

“I have done it.”
“I have heard that before.”
“I have driven a car.”
“I have forgotten the words.”
“I have read that book.”
“I have eaten at that restaurant before.”
“I have flown in an airplane.”
“I have forgiven you.”
“I have seen you before.”
“I have written a letter.”

I used to + (verb)

‘Used to’ expresses something that was done in the past, and is not usually done now.

Here are some examples:

“I used to develop websites.”
“I used to jog every day.”
“I used to paint.”
“I used to smoke.”
“I used to work from home.”
“I used to live in California.”
“I used to go to the beach every day.”
“I used to sing in a choir.”
“I used to like vegetables.”
“I used to start work at 6 o’clock.”

“I have to + (verb)
The words ‘have to’ describe something that needs to take place soon. It expresses certainty, necessity, or obligation.

Here are some examples:

“I have to switch schools.”
“I have to use the telephone.”
“I have to go to the bathroom.”
“I have to leave.”
“I have to unpack my bags.”

You can also add the word ‘don’t’ to suggest that someone is not required to do something.

“I don’t have to switch schools.”
“I don’t have to use the telephone.”
“I don’t have to go to the bathroom.”
“I don’t have to leave.”
“I don’t have to unpack my bags.”

I wanna + (verb)
The word ‘wanna’ is incorrect grammatically. It is equivalent to ‘want to.’ When combined with the word ‘I’ it helps communicate something you want to do.

Here are some examples:

“I wanna talk.”
“I wanna search for a job.”
“I wanna order some food.”
“I wanna marry her.”
“I wanna listen to that song.”

By adding the word ‘don’t’ you can change the meaning of what you are saying to something you ‘want’ to do to something you ‘do not’ want to do.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t wanna talk.”
“I don’t wanna search for a job.”
“I don’t wanna marry her.”
“I don’t wanna listen to that song.”
“I don’t wanna order some food.”

I gotta + (verb)
‘I gotta’ is grammatically incorrect. It is more of a spoken form. If you want to say this with proper grammar, the equivalent would be, ‘I have got to’ or ‘I’ve got to’. In the spoken form, ‘got to’ is shortened to ‘gotta’ and the word ‘have’ is dropped.

Here are some examples:

“I gotta manage my money.”
“I gotta obey the laws.”
“I gotta move to a bigger house.”
“I gotta impress my boss.”
“I gotta brush my teeth.”

By adding the word ‘have’ you can change what you are saying to express something that needs to be done in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“I have got to be on time to work.”
“I’ve gotta try harder at school.”
“I’ve gotta tell my wife I’ll be late.”
“I’ve gotta learn more about the laws.”
“I’ve gotta clean my house today.”

I would like to + (verb)
This sentence lets someone know what you would be interested in doing. This can be a physical, mental or verbal action.

Here are some examples:

“I would like to answer that question.”
“I would like to compete in a cooking contest.”
“I would like to explain myself.”
“I would like to invite you over.”
“I would like to practice.”
“I would like to become a doctor.”
“I would like to see you more often.”
“I would like to thank you.”
“I would like to learn about animals.”
“I would like to meet the Presiden

I plan to + (verb)
‘Plan to’ describes something that you would like to do in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“I plan to find a new apartment.”
“I plan to relax on vacation.”
“I plan to surprise my parents.”
“I plan to wash my car.”
“I plan to adopt a child.”
“I plan to impress my boss.”
“I plan to watch a movie.”
“I plan to save more money.”
“I plan to read a book.”
“I plan to learn new things.”

I’ve decided to + (verb)
‘I’ve’ is short for ‘I have’ and including the word ‘decided’ you are stating that you have made a decision or come to a conclusion.

Here are some examples:

“I’ve decided to accept the job.”
“I’ve decided to complete my degree.”
“I’ve decided to change my bad habits.”
“I’ve decided to extend my membership at the gym.”
“I’ve decided to form a chess club.”
“I’ve decided to hand over my responsibilities.”
“I’ve decided to help you move.”
“I’ve decided to interview for the job.”
“I’ve decided to increase my work load.”
“I’ve decided to manage a store.”

I was about to + (verb)
When stating ‘I was about to’ you are informing someone that you are going to be doing something at that moment or in the very near future.

Here are some examples:

“I was about to go out.”
“I was about to go to dinner.”
“I was about to go to bed.”
“I was about to go to work.”
“I was about to say the same thing.”
“I was about to call you.”
“I was about to send you an email.”
“I was about to mow my grass.”
“I was about to order us some drinks.”
“I was about to watch television.”

I didn’t mean to + (verb)
The word ‘didn’t’ is a contraction of the words ‘did not’. When using it in a sentence with the words ‘mean to’ you are informing someone that you did something you regret or are sorry for. This could have been a physical, mental or verbal action.

Here are some examples:

“I didn’t mean to hurt your feelings.”
“I didn’t mean to call you so late.”
“I didn’t mean to lie about what happened.”
“I didn’t mean to embarrass you.”
“I didn’t mean to stay out so late.”
“I did not mean to say those things.”
“I did not mean to leave you out.”
“I did not mean to make you confused.”
“I did not mean to think you were involved.”
“I did not mean to cause trouble.”

I don’t have time to + (verb)
The word ‘don’t’ is a contraction of the words ‘do not.’ When adding ‘have time to’ you are simply stating that you have other obligations and all other things considered must wait.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t have time to explain.”
“I don’t have time to eat.”
“I don’t have time to exercise.”
“I don’t have time to watch my favorite TV show.”
“I don’t have time to talk.”

You can also use the phrase ‘I don’t’ to express things you do not like, things you do not understand, or things you do not do.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t eat meat.”
“I don’t like the rain.”
“I don’t understand Spanish.”
“I do not understand what you are saying.”
“I do not like scary movies.”
“I do not like sports.”

I promise not to + (verb)
When using the word ‘promise’ you are giving your word that what you are saying is true. You might also be assuring someone a guarantee that you will follow thru on what you are saying to them.

When using ‘promise not to’ you are stating you will not do a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“I promise not to tell.”
“I promise not to leave without you.”
“I promise not to be so late.”
“I promise not to hurt your feelings.”
“I promise not to wake you up.”

You can also just use the word ‘promise’ to assure someone of your intentions.

Here are some examples:

“I promise I am telling the truth.”
“I promise to practice my math.”
“I promise to call you.”
“I promise I will tell you.”
“I promise I will come to your party.”

I’d rather + (verb)
‘I’d’ is a contraction of the words ‘I had’ or ‘I would.’

When using it with the word ‘rather’ you are suggesting you would like to do or prefer one thing more than another.

Here are some examples:

“I’d rather talk about this later.”
“I’d like to eat at home than go get fast food.”
“I’d rather ski than snowboard.”
“I’d rather stay late than come in early tomorrow.”
“I’d rather handle the problem myself.”
“I had rather go home than stay out too late.”
“I had rather listen to my parents or get in trouble.”
“I would rather exercise than sit on the couch all day.”
“I would rather complete my task early.”
“I would rather know the answer.”

I feel like + (verb-ing)
Here you are expressing to someone something you would enjoy doing.

Here are some examples:

“I feel like going for a bike ride.”
“I feel like going to the beach.”
“I feel like having a snack.”
“I feel like talking.”
“I feel like dancing.”
“I feel like having friends over to my house.”
“I feel like watching TV.”

By adding ‘don’t’ or ‘do not’ you can change what you are saying to express something you would not enjoy or express a concern about something.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t feel like leaving yet.”
“I don’t feel like explaining.”
“I don’t feel like going to bed.”
“I do not feel comfortable talking about it.”
“I do not feel like we are going in the right direction.”

I can’t help + (verb-ing)
The word ‘can’t’ is contraction for ‘cannot.’ Combined with ‘help’ you are communicating something you are unable to control or having a hard time gaining a grasp for. This can be a physical or mental action.

Here are some examples:

“I can’t help thinking about it.”
“I can’t help shopping so much.”
“I can’t help working all the time.”
“I can’t help smiling when I see her.”
“I can’t help eating so much.”
“I can’t help loving you.”
“I can not help biting my nails when I am nervous.”
“I can not help smoking when I have been drinking.”
“I cannot help feeling so sad.”
“I cannot help remembering the things you did.”

I was busy + (verb-ing)
When using the word ‘was’, you are referring to something in a past tense, or something that happened before. Combining it with the word ‘busy’ you can express something that was occupying you in a past time.

Here are some examples:

“I was busy thinking.”
“I was busy working.”
“I was busy cooking dinner.”
“I was busy talking on the phone.”
“I was busy cleaning the house.”
“I was busy studying for my test.”
“I was busy thinking of ideas for our website.”
“I was busy entertaining our neighbors.”
“I was busy completing my housework.”
“I was busy learning new things.”

By changing ‘was’ to ‘am’ you change your message from past tense to present tense and refer to something you are doing ‘now.’

Here are some examples:

“I am busy working.”
“I am busy cooking dinner.”
“I am busy studying for my test.”
“I am busy completing housework.”
“I am busy talking on the phone.”

I’m not used to + (verb-ing)
Here you are using ‘not used to’ to inform someone that you are unfamiliar or uncomfortable with a topic at hand.

Here are some examples:

“I’m not used to talking English.”
“I’m not used to studying so much.”
“I’m not used to being around new people.”
“I’m not used to talking in front of groups of people.”
“I’m not used to having so much stress.”
“I’m not used to traveling so much.”
“I’m not used to working so early.”
“I’m not used to having so much responsibility.”
“I’m not used to drinking so much.”

I want you to + (verb)
‘I want you to’ is telling someone that you have a desire or would like for them to do something.

Here are some examples:

“I want you to clean the dishes.”
“I want you to come home right after school.”
“I want you to call once you get there.”
“I want you to explain yourself to me.”
“I want you to educate me.”

By using the word ‘need’ instead of ‘want’ you are expressing something that is required or wanted.

Here are some examples:

“I need you to study harder in school.”
“I need you to stop and listen to me.”
“I need you to greet our guests.”
“I need you to introduce me to your family.”
“I need to request a refund.”

I’m here to + (verb)
You are informing someone that you are at a particular place to accomplish something.

Here are some examples:

“I’m here to apply for the job.”
“I’m here to take a test.”
“I’m here to receive my gift.”
“I’m here to support all your decisions.”
“I’m here to watch a movie.”
“I’m here to work on your computer.”
“I’m here to welcome you to the neighborhood.”
“I’m here to raise awareness for cancer.”
“I’m here to start the job.”
“I’m here to receive the award.”

I have something + (verb)
When using the expression ‘I have something’ you are communicating that you possess something or need to do something that is unspecified or undetermined.

Here are some examples:

“I have something to complete.”
“I have something to share with you.”
“I have something important to tell you.”
“I have something to encourage you.”
“I have something to explain to you.”
“I have something special planned for your birthday.”
“I have something else to consider.”
“I have something to apologize about.”
“I have something to attend tonight.”
“I have something to ask you.”
“I have something fun for us to do.”

I’m looking forward to
When telling someone that you are ‘looking forward to’ you are saying that you are waiting or hoping for something, especially with pleasure.

Here are some examples:

“I’m looking forward to meeting you.”
“I’m looking forward to talking with you.”
“I’m looking forward to going on vacation.”
“I’m looking forward to spending time with my family.”
“I’m looking forward to learning the English language.”
“I am looking forward to visiting another country.”
“I am looking forward to having a family.”
“I am looking forward to graduating from college.”
“I am looking forward to watching the baseball game.”
“I am looking forward to running in a race.”

English Speaking Basics – Section II

English Speaking Basics II is for English speaking beginners who need help to understand the basics of speaking English. We will use very simple phrases and expressions to help you with your English speaking.

This second section contains the next 30 lessons. If any lessons are too easy, please move forward to other lessons.

I’m calling to + (verb)
When using the words ‘I’m calling’ you are stating that you are actually using the phone to call and relay information.

Here are some examples:

“I’m calling to tell you about my day.”
“I’m calling to accept your invitation.”
“I’m calling to answer your question.”
“I’m calling to book a reservation at your restaurant.”
“I’m calling to complain about something.”
“I’m calling to thank you.”
“I’m calling to support your decision.”
“I’m calling to remind you of our dinner plans.”
“I’m calling to report a lost wallet.”
“I’m calling to receive my prize.”

I’m working on + (noun)
‘I’m’ is a contraction for the words ‘I am.’ The phrase ‘working on’ relays a physical or mental effort towards an accomplishment.

Here are some examples:

“I’m working on a big project.”
“I’m working on training my dog.”
“I’m working on making new friends.”
“I’m working on educating myself.”
“I’m working on my homework.”
“I am working on painting a house.”
“I am working on a new idea.”
“I am working on my computer.”
“I’m working on my website.”

I’m sorry to + (verb)
Saying you are ‘sorry to’ expresses a feeling of sympathy or regret.

Here are some examples:

“I’m sorry to be so late.”
“I’m sorry to hear about your sick mother.”
“I’m sorry to waste your time.”
“I’m sorry to make you feel so sad.”
“I’m sorry to frighten you.”
“I’m sorry to disagree with your decision.”
“I’m sorry to call so late.”
“I’m sorry to admit what I did.”
“I’m sorry to end this relationship.”

I’m thinking of + (verb-ing)
‘Thinking’ refers to a process of thought, forming an opinion or judgment. When expressing ‘I am thinking of’ you are letting someone know what you are personally thinking.

Here are some examples:

“I’m thinking of checking out the new movie.”
“I’m thinking of filming my vacation.”
“I’m thinking of following a healthy diet.”
“I’m thinking of handing out flyers describing our business.”
“I’m thinking of increasing my work load.”
“I am thinking of introducing myself to him.”
“I am thinking of launching a new website.”
“I am thinking of moving to a new city.”
“I am thinking of offering her the position.”
“I am thinking of opening up a store.”

I’ll help you + (verb)
This lets you inform someone that you are willing to provide assistance. This could refer to something physical or mental, like helping someone to ‘think’ or ‘remember’ something.

Here are some examples:

“I’ll help you cook dinner tonight.”
“I’ll help you raise money for your charity.”
“I’ll help you register for your class online.”
“I’ll help you move to your new house.”
“I’ll help you prevent that from happening again.”
“I will help you park your car.”
“I will help you provide all the information you need.”
“I will help you realize your potential.”
“I will help you stop smoking.”
“I will help you shop for groceries.”

I’m dying to + (verb)
When using the word ‘dying’ in this manner you are referring to wanting or desiring something greatly.

Here are some examples:

“I’m dying to relax on the beach.”
“I’m dying to pick some fresh fruit.”
“I’m dying to order some desserts.”
“I’m dying to find out if I got the job.”
“I’m dying to move to a bigger house.”
“I’m dying to look at all the work you’ve done.”
“I’m dying to learn more about you.”
“I’m dying to introduce you to my parents.”
“I’m dying to expand my business.”
“I’m dying to check my score on the test.”

It’s my turn to + (verb)
The word ‘It’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘it is.’ When stating ‘my turn’ you are telling someone that it is time to change position or position focuses on to you.

Here are some examples:

“It’s my turn to walk you home.”
“It’s my turn to do laundry.”
“It’s my turn to work late.”
“It’s my turn to take out the trash.”
“It’s my turn to choose where we eat.”
“It is my turn to pay for dinner.”
“It is my turn to roll the dice.”
“It is my turn to provide an answer.”
“It is my turn to try and play the game.”
“It is my turn to attempt solving the problem.”

It’s hard for me to + (verb)
When saying that something is ‘hard for me’ you are informing someone that what you are talking about is difficult or challenging for you.

Here are some examples:

“It’s hard for me to accept what you are telling me.”
“It’s hard for me to argue your point.”
“It’s hard for me to balance my check book.”
“It’s hard for me to concentrate on the task.”
“It’s hard for me to consider your other options.”
“It’s hard for me to depend on you.”
“It is hard for me to decide where to go tonight.”
“It is hard for me to explain my actions.”
“It is hard for me to guarantee your success.”
“It is hard for me to handle so much pressure.”

I’m having a hard time + (verb-ing)
By stating you are having a hard time you are letting someone know you are having difficulty with something. This could be something physical or mental and something that could be overcome with effort.

Here are some examples:

“I’m having a hard time writing.”
“I’m having a hard time understanding you.”
“I’m having a hard time answering your question.”
“I’m having a hard time downloading songs to my iPod.”
“I’m having a hard time agreeing to the terms.”

With the addition of a verb you can express in more detail just how difficult something is for you.

Here are some examples:

“I’m having an extremely hard time trusting you.”
“I’m having an extremely hard time with my wife.”
“I’m having a very hard time finding a job.”
“I’m having a very hard time finding parts for my car.”

I think I should + (verb)
Here you are telling someone that you feel strongly about doing a particular action. Here are some examples:

“I think I should practice my reading.”
“I think I should join a study group.”
“I think I should handle this as soon as possible.”
“I think I should earn my degree.”
“I think I should explain myself.”

By adding the word ‘don’t’ you have changed what you are conveying from something you are thinking of doing, to something you are against.

Here are some examples:

“I do not think I should complain so much.”
“I do not think I should attend that event.”
“I do not think I should borrow more money.”
“I do not think I should doubt you.”
“I do not think I should decide until later.”

I’ve heard that + (subject + verb)
You are letting someone know that you are aware of something or that you have been informed of something that is taking place. This could be something that has already happened or something happening in the near future. ‘I’ve’ is a contraction of the words ‘I have.’

Here are some examples:

“I’ve heard that you got a new job.”
“I’ve heard that you want to leave your job.”
“I’ve heard that you got a new car.”
“I’ve heard that you like to jog.”
“I’ve heard that you fix computers.”
“I’ve heard that you’ve never been to Canada.”
“I’ve heard that you like to shop.”
“I’ve heard that you and your boss don’t get along.”
“I’ve heard that there is no school next week.”
“I’ve heard that your wife is a yoga instructor.”

It occurred to me that (subject + verb)
The word ‘occurred’ informs someone that something has come to mind or has been found. You are letting someone know that you suddenly have thought or remembered about something.

Here are some examples:

“It occurred to me that I forgot your birthday.”
“It occurred to me that we both belong to the same gym.”
“It occurred to me that we enjoy a lot of the same things.”
“It occurred to me the price for homes are more expensive here.”
“It occurred to me that eating healthy makes me feel better.”

Using the word ‘had’ or ‘has’ can change what you are saying to represent something remembered in a past time.

Here are some examples:

“It had occurred to me that I forgot something at the grocery.”
“It had occurred to me I might need to change my email address.”
“It has occurred to me I forgot my mom’s birthday.”
“It has occurred to me before.”

Let me + (verb)
‘Let me’ is suggesting that you are asking for permission or an opportunity to do something.

Here are some examples:

“Let me make my own decisions.”
“Let me offer to help you.”
“Let me open the door for you.”
“Let me pause and think about what we are doing.”
“Let me welcome you to the neighborhood.”
“Let me save you the trouble.”
“Let me make a suggestion.”
“Let me try and fix your car.”
“Let me taste the soup before you add more spices.”
“Let me treat you to some ice cream.”

Thank you for
Saying ‘thank you’ is telling someone you appreciate what they have done. This can either be something they did for you or for someone else.

Here are some examples:

“Thank you for inviting me.”
“Thank you for helping me move.”
“Thank you for informing me about the job opening.”
“Thank you for mailing that package for me.”
“Thank you for working so hard.”
“Thank you for stopping by to visit.”
“Thank you for replying to my email.”
“Thank you for providing me with the answers.”
“Thank you for heating up dinner.”
“Thank you for hurrying to get here.”

Can I + (verb)
When ending a sentence with a question mark (?) you are asking the person or people you are talking to a question for which you would like an answer. Here you are asking permission to do a particular action.

Here are some examples:

“Can I answer your question?”
“Can I attend the event?”
“Can I move to another spot?”
“Can I call you tomorrow?”
“Can I complete this later?”
“Can I explain myself?”
“Can I help you with your homework?”
“Can I include you in our plans?”
“Can I introduce you to my co-workers?”
“Can I inform you of some bad news?”

Can I get + (noun)
The phrase ‘Can I get’ can be used in a couple different ways. You can use it to ask a question.

Here are some examples:

“Can I get a cup of water?”
“Can I get a dog?”
“Can I get lunch?”
“Can I get sugar in my coffee?”
“Can I get popcorn at the movie?”

You can also use it when offering to help someone or do something for them.

Here are some examples:

“Can I get you another drink?”
“Can I help you move that?”
“Can I recommend a good place to eat?”
“Can I take you home?”
“Can I help you finish your project?”

I’m not sure if (subject + verb)
‘I’m not sure’ expresses a feeling of uncertainty or lack of confidence on a particular matter.

Here are some examples:

“I am not sure if they will offer me the job.”
“I’m not sure if she’ll return my call.”
“I’m not sure if my wife will understand.”
“I’m not sure if we will go out tonight.”
“I’m not sure if I understand your question.”
“I am not sure if I can handle it.”
“I am not sure if it will happen.”
“I am not sure if it will matter.”
“I am not sure if my mom will notice.”
“I am not sure if they will permit us to park there.”

Do you mind if I + (verb)
You are asking someone in present tense if they object to something you are asking.

Here are some examples:

“Do you mind if I excuse myself?”
“Do you mind if we left early?”
“Do you mind if I take a nap?”
“Do you mind if I ask your mom?”
“Do you mind if it snows?”

You could also use the word ‘would’

Here are some examples:

“Would you mind if we went out to eat?”
“Would you mind if I opened the window?”
“Would you mind telling me what you’re doing?”
“Would you mind being quiet for a minute?”
“Would you mind if I changed the channel?”

I don’t know what to + (verb)
You are letting someone know that you are not sure about what is being asked. You may also have no knowledge or opinion on a topic.

Here are some examples:

“I don’t know what to eat for dinner.”
“I don’t know what to buy you for your birthday.”
“I don’t know what to say.”
“I don’t know what to do with my spare time.”
“I don’t know what to do for vacation.”
“I do not know what to do to make you happy.”
“I do not know what to do to help you understand.”
“I do not know what to think.”
“I do not know what to do to prevent this.”
“I do not know what to order.”

I should have + (past participle)
‘Should’ is the past tense of the word ‘shall.’ When using the words ‘should have’ you are talking about something in the past that you ‘ought to’ or ‘might have’ done.

Here are some examples:

“I should have gone with you.”
“I should have studied more for my test.”
“I should have read the directions before starting.”
“I should have eaten breakfast this morning.”
“I should have listened to your advice.”
“I should have married her when I had the chance.”

‘Shall’ is something that will take place or exist in the future.

Here are some examples:

“I shall leave tomorrow.”
“I shall finish the job next week.”
“I shall see it tomorrow.”
“I shall go outside if it’s nice out.”
“I shall pay for this later.”

I wish I could + (verb)
You are expressing a desire to do something.

Here are some examples:

“I wish I could sing better.”
“I wish I could settle the argument.”
“I wish I could sail around the world.”
“I wish I could remain calm during all of this.”
“I wish I could remember his name.”
“I wish I could replace my old car with a new one.”
“I wish I could play outside.”
“I wish I could go to the game with you.”
“I wish I could write better.”
“I wish I could own my own business.”

You should + (verb)
Here you are suggesting an obligation or duty that needs to take place either now or in the near future.

Here are some examples:

“You should go to bed.”
“You should do your homework before going outside.”
“You should replace you headlights on your car.”
“You should request a raise at work.”
“You should stop smoking.”
“You should smile more.”
“You should slow down when driving in a neighborhood.”
“You should talk to him about it.”
“You should train your dog.”
“You should trust what they say.”

You’re supposed to + (verb)
‘You’re’ is a contraction of the words ‘you are.’ When using ‘You’re’ with the words ‘supposed to’ you are making a suggestion that something you strongly believe ought to happen.

Here are some examples:

“You’re supposed to keep that secret.”
“You’re supposed to let me know when you leave.”
“You’re supposed to stop when at a red light.”
“You’re supposed to unpack once you get there.”
“You’re supposed to return the movies you rent on time.”
“You are supposed to remain calm.”
“You are supposed to fasten your seat belt.”
“You are supposed to invite all your friends.”
“You are supposed to encourage one another.”
“You are supposed to decide before next Thursday.”

You seem + (adjective)
When stating ‘you seem’ you’re referring to the person you are talking to and expressing that they are giving the impression of or appear to be.

Here are some examples:

“You seem bored.”
“You seem unhappy with the results.”
“You seem eager to begin.”
“You seem easy to get along with.”
“You seem elated to hear the good news.”
“You seem deeply in love.”
“You seem afraid of roller coasters.”
“You seem confused about the rules of the game.”
“You seem embarrassed about what happened.”
“You seem decisive about your choice.”

You’d better + (verb)
‘You’d’ is a contraction of ‘you had’ or ‘you would.’ You are making a suggestion to someone for a particular action.

Here are some examples:

“You’d better exercise.”
“You’d better help out.”
“You’d better invite your brother.”
“You’d better impress the judges.”
“You’d better listen to your parents.”
“You had better not come home late.”
“You had better hope for the best.”
“You had better change your attitude.”
“You would be good at teaching.”
“You would do well at math.”

Are you into + (noun)
Here you are asking a question about an interest they might have or something they might enjoy doing.

Here are some examples:

“Are you into soccer?”
“Are you into trying new things?”
“Are you into wine tasting?”
“Are you into working out at home or at the gym?”
“Are you into scary movies?”
“Are you into playing games?”
“Are you into jogging?”
“Are you into painting?”
“Are you into traveling?”
“Are you into fixing cars?”

Are you trying to + (verb)
You are asking someone if they are attempting to do something. This can be something mentally or physically.

Here are some examples:

“Are you trying to ignore me?”
“Are you trying to manage your money?”
“Are you trying to memorize that song?”
“Are you trying to offer your help?”
“Are you trying to program your new phone?”
“Are you trying to pretend like it never happened?”
“Are you trying to remain calm?”
“Are you trying to remember her name?”
“Are you trying to reflect on the past?”
“Are you trying to switch flights?”

Please + (verb)
‘Please’ is generally used in a polite request when asking someone to do something.

Here are some examples:

“Please pass me the salt.”
“Please order me the steak and potatoes.”
“Please stop bothering me.”
“Please wash your hands before dinner.”
“Please wait outside until we are ready.”
“Please zip up your coat before you go outside.”
“Please stand back.”

The word ‘please’ can also mean to give enjoyment or satisfaction to.

Here are some examples:

“The smell of the flowers was very pleasing.”
“May it please the court to admit this into evidence?”
“I was very pleased with how the children behaved in class.”
“You cannot please everyone all the time.”
“She was pleased with the dress.”

Don’t + (verb)
The word ‘don’t’ is a contraction of the words ‘do not.’ It is said to convey a message of what NOT should be done.

Here are some examples:

“Don’t try and fool me.”
“Don’t allow this to happen.”
“Don’t watch scary movies before you go to bed.”
“Don’t cause any more trouble.”
“Don’t chew gum in class.”
“Do not concern yourself with other people’s problems.”
“Do not behave that way.”
“Do not announce your decision until you’re ready.”
“Do not argue with me.”
“Do not arrive late for your meeting.

Do you like
With this question you are asking someone what they prefer or enjoy.

Here are some examples:

“Do you like traveling on a plane?”
“Do you like watching baseball on TV?”
“Do you like skiing or snowboarding?”
“Do you like going to bed early?”
“Do you like spending time with me?”
“Do you like repeating the class?”
“Do you like playing video games?”
“Do you like listening to music?”
“Do you like practicing playing the piano?”
“Do you like jogging with me?”

How often do you
When asking this question you are inquiring how often or how frequent someone does a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“How often do you exercise?”
“How often do you change your password?”
“How often do you help out at school?”
“How often do you listen to your MP3 player?”
“How often do you need to go to the dentist?”
“How often do you receive your magazine in the mail?”
“How often do you report to your supervisor?”
“How often do you stretch before working out?”
“How often do you talk to your parents?”
“How often do you travel?”

Do you want me to + (verb)
To ‘want’ is to feel or have a desire for. When saying ‘Do you want me to’ you’re asking someone if there is anything you can do for them or assist them with.

Here are some examples:

“Do you want me to pick up the kids?”
“Do you want me to fix your flat tire?”
“Do you want me to help you read that book?”
“Do you want me to remind you?”
“Do you want me to remove my shoes?”

The word ‘want’ can also be used to express something YOU would like someone else to do or that something you personally would enjoy.

Here are some examples:

“I want you to come over.”
“I want you to make a decision.”
“I want you to water the flowers.”
“I want to understand what you are trying to say.”
“I want to be better at swimming.”
“I want to be more involved at church.”

What do you think about (verb-ing)
This question asks someone their opinion about a topic.

Here are some examples:

“What do you think about having a cup of tea with me?”
“What do you think about working overtime next week?”
“What do you think about waiting in line for tickets?”
“What do you think about sailing?”
“What do you think about staying here another night?”
“What do you think about retiring from your job?”
“What do you think about planting new trees in the backyard?”
“What do you think about offering to babysit?”
“What do you think about living in a new city?”
“What do you think about filming our vacation?”

Why don’t we + (verb)
‘Don’t’ is a contraction of ‘do not.’ When using ‘why’ you are asking a question that involves yourself and the person you are talking to.

Here are some examples:

“Why don’t we go bowling tonight?”
“Why don’t we pick some fresh flowers?”
“Why don’t we play a game of chess?”
“Why don’t we save more money?”
“Why don’t we remember this place?”
“Why don’t we test this before using it?”
“Why don’t we try and do it again?”
“Why don’t we post our results online?”
“Why don’t we gather more firewood?”
“Why don’t we earn more money?”

It’s too bad that
‘Too bad’ means regrettable or unfortunate. When using it in a sentence you are expressing a concern or regret for what has taken place. The topic being discussed could have happened to you, the person you are talking to, or someone or something else.

Here are some examples:

“It’s too bad that she lost her job.”
“It’s too bad that you have to go.”
“It’s too bad that I found out about it.”
“It’s too bad we will not be there on time.”
“It’s too bad that tickets are all gone to that concert.”
“It’s too bad that it is supposed to rain.”
“It’s too bad that she got hurt.”
“It’s too bad that my work has to lay off people.”
“It’s too bad that you do not understand.”

You could have + (past participle)
Using ‘could have’ you are speaking about something that was, should be or would be. You are stating that they had other options that could have been chosen.

Here are some examples:

“You could have completed it sooner.”
“You could have blown your chance.”
“You could have done better on your exam.”
“You could have given me more time to get ready.”
“You could have heard that from someone else.”
“You could have sent that package first class.”
“You could have slept in a little longer.”
“You could have written him a letter.”
“You could have thought of something to do.”
“You could have upset her by saying that.” If I were you, I would + (verb)
Here you are giving an example of what decision YOU would do given the circumstances. This can be in past tense or in a conditional present.

Here are some examples:

“If I were you, I would enjoy my vacation.”
“If I were you, I would explain what happened.”
“If I were you, I would continue working until it is done.”
“If I were you, I would book my reservations now.”
“If I were you, I would answer the question.”

By adding ‘have’ after the word ‘would’ you are talking about something in the past tense.

Here are some examples:

“If I were you, I would have enjoyed my vacation.”
“If I were you, I would have explained what happened.”
“If I were you, I would have continued working until it was done.”
“If I were you, I would have booked my reservations now.”
“If I were you, I would have answered the question.”

It’s gonna be + (adjective)
You’re informing someone what something is going to be like. This could be something you are going to do, see or feel.

Here are some examples:

“It’s going to be delicious.”
“It’s gonna be easy.”
“It’s gonna be depressing.”
“It’s going to be exciting.”
“It’s going to be disgusting.”

You can also add ‘he or she’ or a person’s name to describe how they might react to something.

Here are some examples:

“He is going to be tough to deal with.”
“He is going to be terrific at that.”
“She is going to be relieved to hear that.”
“She is going to be scared after watching that movie.”
“Sally is going to be successful.”

It looks like + (noun)
You could be describing how something is similar or appears to be by the way it looks.

Here are some examples:

“It looks like a balloon.”
“It looks like a jellyfish.”
“It looks like a banana.”
“It looks like a fish.”
You can also use ‘it looks like’ to describe something that might be in the future.

Here are some examples:

“It looks like it’s going to rain.”
“It looks like it’s going to be fun.”
“It looks like it’s going to be a long day.”

You can also use it to describe something in the present tense.

Here are some examples:

“It looks like they are leaving.”
“It looks like he is waving to us.”
“It looks like she is lost.”
“It looks like they are racing.”
That’s why + (subject + verb)
‘That’s’ is short for ‘that is.’ Here you are telling someone ‘because of this’ or ‘therefore.’

Here are some examples:

“That’s why people admire you.”
“That’s why she appears so happy.”
“That’s why babies crawl before they can walk.”
“That’s why Pam cries at sad movies.”
“That’s why you fail to understand.”
“That is why you help out people in need.”
“That is why you try and include everyone.”
“That is why you lock your doors when you leave home.”
“That is why she smiles when you walk by.”
“That is why you use it for emergencies.”

It’s time to + (verb)
You are letting someone know that something is required to be done at the present time.

Here are some examples:

“It’s time to say goodbye.”
“It’s time to ask for a raise.”
“It’s time to collect our money.”
“It’s time to cheer for our team.”
“It’s time to change the clocks.”
“It is time to decide what to do.”
“It is time to enjoy ourselves.”
“It is time to fill me in on what’s going on.”
“It is time to help out.”
“It is time to join a gym.”

The point is that + (subject + verb)
By stating ‘the point is’ you are stating in your opinion the meaning about what is actually happening.

Here are some examples:

“The point is that if you study you will do well in school.”
“The point is that she does not understand.”
“The point is that we need this done today.”
“The point is that the world would be a better place.”
“The point is that we should help.”
“The point is that snakes can be dangerous.”
“The point is that leaving a baby alone is not a good idea.”
“The point is that if we do not leave now we will be late.”
“The point is that she needs to be more responsible.”
“The point is that we need to work together.”

How was + (noun)
By using the words ‘how was’ you are asking someone a question about something that happened or something they did in the past.

Here are some examples:

“How was your meeting?”
“How was your doctor’s appointment?”
“How was the birthday party?”
“How was lunch?”
“How was the airplane ride?”
“How was vacation?”
“How were your parents?”
“How were roads when you drove home?”
“How were people acting after what happened?”
“How were holidays with the family?”

How about + (verb-ing)
You’re asking someone their opinion on something or if they would like to do something.

Here are some examples:

“How about singing?”
“How about hanging out tonight?”
“How about folding the laundry for me?”
“How about helping us out?”
“How about describing to me what happened?”
“How about exploring new ideas?”
“How about comparing prices before we buy it?”
“How about considering it?”
“How about following me to their house?”
“How about feeding the dogs?”

What if + (subject + verb)
Here you are asking a question about ‘in the event of’ or ‘in the event that.’ Usually you are looking for an answer at the time of the question that is being asked.

Here are some examples:

“What if I miss the bus?”
“What if I were late to dinner?”
“What if I called her tomorrow?”
“What if I don’t understand?”
“What if someone sees me?”
“What if no one is home?”
“What if they decide to stay?”
“What if it rains while we are camping?”
“What if I do not finish on time?”
“What if we introduce ourselves first?”

How much does it cost to + (verb)
You are simply asking how much you would need to pay to do something.

Here are some examples:

“How much does it cost to fly to Europe?”
“How much does it cost to own a house?”
“How much does it cost to play a round of golf?”
“How much does it cost to join a gym?”
“How much does it cost to repair my car?”
“How much would it cost to talk long distance?”
“How much would it cost to run a website?”
“How much would it cost to wash my car?”
“How much would it cost to rent a car?”
“How much would it cost to go to the movies?”

How come + (subject + verb)
When using ‘how come’ you are asking why a particular thing has or had to take place.

Here are some examples:

“How come parents worry so much?”
“How come people carpool to work?”
“How come you are so upset?”
“How come he will not call you?”
“How come you stayed out so late?”
“How come you cannot make a decision?”
“How come you always question me?”
“How come we never agree?”
“How come your dog digs in the yard?”
“How come she will not come over?”

What are the chances of + (verb-ing)
By asking ‘what are the chances of’ you are wondering how often or in what case would a particular thing happen.

Here are some examples:

“What are the chances of getting tickets?”
“What are the chances of that happening?”
“What are the chances of it raining today?”
“What are the chances of winning the lottery?”

When replacing the word ‘the’ with ‘your’ or ‘our’ you can ask what the chances ‘personally’ that the topic will happen.

Here are some examples:

“What are the chances of you staying home today?”
“What are your chances of getting the job?”
“What are your chances of improving?”
“What are your chances of moving?”
“What are our chances of staying together?”
“What are our chances of working together?”
“What are our chances of going together?”

There is something wrong with + (noun)
You are informing someone that there is something not right or out of the ordinary.

Here are some examples:

“There is something wrong with my laptop.”
“There is something wrong with my car.”
“There is something wrong with my cell phone.”
“There is something wrong with my head.”
“There is something wrong with your answering machine.”
“There is something wrong with your way of thinking.”
“There is something wrong with your attitude.”
“There is something wrong with your dog.”
“There is something wrong with our relationship.”
“There is something wrong with our alarm clock.”

Let’s not + (verb)
The word ‘let’s’ is formed from the words ‘let us.’ Here you are requesting that something not take place at this moment or that what is happening needs to be contained or lessened.

Here are some examples:

“Let’s not discuss this now.”
“Let’s not stay here too long.”
“Let’s not stop anywhere on the way.”
“Let’s not remain mad at each other.”
“Let’s not meddle in other people’s business.”
“Let us not get too excited.”
“Let us not worry too much.”
“Let us not interrupt them when they are talking.”
“Let us help you.”
“Let us get that for you.”

Let’s say that + (subject + verb)
‘Let’s’ is a contraction for ‘let us.’ You are suggesting to someone that you should both agree on what you will communicate to someone else.

Here are some examples:

“Let’s say that you love to fish.”
“Let’s say we found it.”
“Let’s say that we enjoy being with them.”
“Let’s say that we had a good time.”
“Let’s say that it’s hard to decide.”
“Let’s say that we have to go.”
“Let’s say that we can host.”
“Let’s say that I have to work.”
“Let’s say that the movie was really good.”

There’s no need to + (verb)
The word ‘there’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘there is’ or ‘there has.’ When expressing ‘no need’ you are stating that the action does not need to take place.

Here are some examples:

“There’s no need to worry.”
“There’s no need to be upset.”
“There’s no need to act so strange.”
“There’s no need to act so shy.”
“There’s no need to rush off.”
“There’s no need to talk now.”
“There is no need to call this late.”
“There is no need to bother him.”
“There is no need to run away.”
“There is no need to stop now.”

It takes + (time) + to + (verb)
You are letting someone know how long it will take to do a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“It takes one hour to get there.”
“It takes forty-five minutes for me to get ready.”
“It takes four quarters to complete a football game.”
“It takes 7 seconds for my car to go 60 miles per hour.”
“It takes all day for us to finish golfing.”
“It takes years to learn to play guitar.”
“It takes 15 minutes to get to downtown.”
“It takes me one hour to cook.”

Please make sure that + (subject + verb)
You are asking someone to make sure that a particular thing happens or takes place.

Here are some examples:

“Please make sure that she wakes up on time.”
“Please make sure that she gets to school.”
“Please make sure that dinner is ready when we get home.”
“Please make sure that your assignment is done.”
“Please make sure that the water is not too hot.”
“Please make sure you cook the meat long enough.”
“Please make sure that she is getting along with her new friends.”
“Please make sure that we leave on time.”
“Please make sure you record our favorite TV show.”
“Please make sure that you don’t stay out too late.”

Here’s to + (noun)
‘Here’s to’ is used in a way of celebrating or identifying a person, place, or thing of significance. It is usually said while toasting someone at dinner, or signaling to someone or something after an event.

Here are some examples:

“Here’s to the winner!”
“Here’s to your marriage!”
“Here’s to the New Year!”
“Here’s to great friends!”
“Here’s to starting a new job!”
“Here is to the luckiest guy in the world!”
“Here is to you!”
“Here is to happiness!”
“Here is to a wonderful day!”
“Here is to great memories!”

It’s no use + (verb-ing)
‘It’s’ is a contraction for ‘it is.’ By stating ‘it’s no use’ you are saying that what you or someone else is doing is not recommended or uncalled for.

Here are some examples:

“It’s no use crying.”
“It’s no use separating them.”
“It’s no use talking to her.”
“It’s no use whining about it.”
“It’s no use apologizing.”
“It’s no use attempting to please him.”
“It’s no use arguing about it.”
“It’s no use behaving that way.”
“It’s no use cleaning up.”
“It’s no use checking on it yet.”

There’s no way + (subject + verb)
‘There’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘there is.’ By stating ‘there’s no way’ you are relaying a thought of doubt about an event taking place now or in the future.

Here are some examples:

“There’s no way you finish on time.”
“There’s no way we complete on time.”
“There’s no way your mother approves.”
“There’s no way no one claims it.”
“There’s no way they expect it.”
“There’s no way he can fix it.”
“There’s no way he can handle the news.”
“There’s no way your brother injured his ankle.”
“There is no way that horse jumps it.”
“There is no way he missed it.”
It takes + (time) + to + (verb)
You are letting someone know how long it will take to do a particular thing.

Here are some examples:

“It takes one hour to get there.”
“It takes forty-five minutes for me to get ready.”
“It takes four quarters to complete a football game.”
“It takes 7 seconds for my car to go 60 miles per hour.”
“It takes all day for us to finish golfing.”
“It takes years to learn to play guitar.”
“It takes 15 minutes to get to downtown.”
“It takes me one hour to cook.”

Please make sure that + (subject + verb)
You are asking someone to make sure that a particular thing happens or takes place.

Here are some examples:

“Please make sure that she wakes up on time.”
“Please make sure that she gets to school.”
“Please make sure that dinner is ready when we get home.”
“Please make sure that your assignment is done.”
“Please make sure that the water is not too hot.”
“Please make sure you cook the meat long enough.”
“Please make sure that she is getting along with her new friends.”
“Please make sure that we leave on time.”
“Please make sure you record our favorite TV show.”
“Please make sure that you don’t stay out too late.”

Here’s to + (noun)
‘Here’s to’ is used in a way of celebrating or identifying a person, place, or thing of significance. It is usually said while toasting someone at dinner, or signaling to someone or something after an event.

Here are some examples:

“Here’s to the winner!”
“Here’s to your marriage!”
“Here’s to the New Year!”
“Here’s to great friends!”
“Here’s to starting a new job!”
“Here is to the luckiest guy in the world!”
“Here is to you!”
“Here is to happiness!”
“Here is to a wonderful day!”
“Here is to great memories!”

It’s no use + (verb-ing)
‘It’s’ is a contraction for ‘it is.’ By stating ‘it’s no use’ you are saying that what you or someone else is doing is not recommended or uncalled for.

Here are some examples:

“It’s no use crying.”
“It’s no use separating them.”
“It’s no use talking to her.”
“It’s no use whining about it.”
“It’s no use apologizing.”
“It’s no use attempting to please him.”
“It’s no use arguing about it.”
“It’s no use behaving that way.”
“It’s no use cleaning up.”
“It’s no use checking on it yet.”

There’s no way + (subject + verb)
‘There’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘there is.’ By stating ‘there’s no way’ you are relaying a thought of doubt about an event taking place now or in the future.

Here are some examples:

“There’s no way you finish on time.”
“There’s no way we complete on time.”
“There’s no way your mother approves.”
“There’s no way no one claims it.”
“There’s no way they expect it.”
“There’s no way he can fix it.”
“There’s no way he can handle the news.”
“There’s no way your brother injured his ankle.”
“There is no way that horse jumps it.”
“There is no way he missed it.”

It’s very kind of you to + (verb)
When saying it is ‘kind of you’ you are saying that what someone has done or said was very appreciated or welcomed.

Here are some examples:

“It’s very kind of you to offer me the job.”
“It’s very kind of you to listen to me.”
“It’s very kind of you to join me.”
“It’s very kind of you to invite us.”
“It’s very kind of you to inform us what happened.”
“It is kind of you to help us.”
“It is kind of you to fill me in.”
“It is kind of you to entertain us.”
“It is kind of you to double my salary.”
“It is kind of you to decorate for the party.”

There’s nothing + (subject) + can + (verb)
‘There’s’ is a contraction of the words ‘there is.’ When using the word ‘nothing’ you are suggesting that something cannot happen or be done.

Here are some examples:

“There’s nothing you can harm.”
“There’s nothing the police can identify.”
“There’s nothing we can agree on.”
“There’s nothing we can join.”
“There’s nothing she can cook.”
“There’s nothing my dog can learn.”

By using the word ‘can’ or ‘can’t’ you change the expression to mean that all is possible.

Here are some examples:

“There is nothing I cannot ask for.”
“There’s nothing we cannot accomplish.”
“There’s nothing our dog cannot open.”
“There’s nothing that truck cannot move

Rumor has it that + (subject + verb)
‘Rumor has it’ is an expression used when suggesting you might have heard something or read about something that is taking place now or in the future. A rumor is not a fact.

Here are some examples:

“Rumor has it that that player will get traded.”
“Rumor has it that she cheated on him.”
“Rumor has it that they are going to get married.”
“Rumor has it that you like to paint.”
“Rumor has it that show is going to end.”
“Rumor has it that he is going to get a raise.”
“Rumor has it that your sister got in trouble.”
“Rumor has it that she goes to our gym.”
“Rumor has it that he will not return.”
“Rumor has it that it happened while texting.”

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M. Murad

M. Murad

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