Theme and Summary of The Schoolboy by William Blake

Theme and Summary of The Schoolboy by William Blake

I love to rise in a summer morn,
When the birds sing on every tree;
The distant huntsman winds his horn,
And the sky-lark sings with me.
O what sweet company!
Continue reading

Comparison Between William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience.

Compare and Contrast between William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience.

Introduction: In songs of innocence William Blake sings the songs of enjoyment and happiness and he is the piper of happy and pleasant songs that make the children more delighted to hear. Here, Nurse of innocence keeps herself in very close with nature and children. She feels very happy and relaxed in her heart when children whisper, play and scream. Continue reading

Critical Analysis of Introduction by William Blake

Songs of Innocence 

Introduction: William Blake is considered as the poet of children’s right. Most of the themes of his poets or songs are about the rights of the children. In Introduction, he has urged his audience to listen to “the voice of the Bard!” who can see past, present, and future. In contrast to the “Introduction” for Songs of Innocence, this poem introduces a more mature and polished poetic voice in the bard. This speaker’s poetry is characterized by direct revelation rather than by the shepherds’ inner melodies, and therefore holds the authority of both divinity and experience. Continue reading

Summary of The Lamb by William Blake

Summary of The Lamb by William Blake

Summary: In the beginning of the song the speaker who is a child is very curious about the creature of the lamb. So, he asks the lamb about its origins and he wants to know where they come from. Then he repeats his question in a slightly different way.  Gradually, the speaker wants to know who gave the lamb life and that voracious appetite for greenery that leads it to travel by streams and over meadows. He explains that the lamb has a creator who gave it “clothing of delight,” which sounds like the next high-end fashion line.  Continue reading

Critical Analysis of The Echoing Green by William Blake

Critical Analysis of The Echoing Green by William Blake

Introduction: “The Echoing Green” is a great creation of William Blake which is more, a lovely landscape graced with the sound of vernal sports of children, birds and bells. It is taken from Blake’s Snogs of Innocence. It is heavenly voice of childhood unchallenged by the test and doubts of later years. This is a pictorial poem of Blake. Generally, William Blake’s short poems are explained very simply, but there are hidden depths to his work. Again his longer poems are mentioned extremely difficult. Continue reading

Critical Analysis of “The Lamb” by William Blake

Introduction: “The Lamb” is designed in two different stanzas. In the first stanza the author raises many questions by the child to the lamb and in the second part the child itself answers those questions.

Form: “The Lamb” has two stanzas; each stanza bears five rhymed couplets. Repetition in the first and last couplet of each stanza makes these lines into a refrain, and helps to give the poem its song-like quality. The flowing l’s and soft vowel sounds contribute to this effect, and also suggest the bleating of a lamb or the lisping character of a child’s chant.

Development of thought: A child who symbolizes Jesus Christ asks a lamb if it knows its merciful creator, its feeder or the giver of its delightful and comfortable clothing of fleece. Continue reading

Critical Analysis of The Shepherd by William Blake

Critical Analysis of The Shepherd by William Blake

 Summary:  The poem tells about of a Shepherd who cares for his flock, and it only includes positive language about the relationship between shepherd and sheep. The shepherd has no fixed workplace, must only follow his sheep, and has “songs of praise” on this tongue constantly. He has nothing to listen to but the “innocent call” of the lamb and the “tender reply” of the sheep. He follows his sheep ‘all the day’, he ‘hears’ everything and is ‘watchful’. The flock is ‘innocent’, ‘tender’ and ‘in peace’. The Shepherd’s presence gives them this ‘peace’, while their innocence affects him by giving him a ‘sweet’ life, and filling his tongue with ‘praise’. The dependent and caring inter-relationship of shepherd and sheep seems peaceful, then. Continue reading