Category Archive: Poem

Nov 12

Ulysses by Alfred Lord Tennyson

Ulysses by Alfred Lord Tennyson   It little profits that an idle king, By this still hearth, among these barren crags, Match’d with an aged wife, I mete and dole Unequal laws unto a savage race, That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me. I cannot rest from travel: I will drink

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Nov 12

Critical analysis of Ulysses by Alfred Lord Tennyson

Critical analysis of Ulysses Subjective Note: The poem expresses the insatiable thirst of the human soul for knowledge. It was the spirit of the Italian Renaissance that made modern Europe what it is today. He has also given us here a picture of that mind. He kept up his attitude of mind throughout life and repeated …

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Nov 07

John Keats as an Escapist

John Keats as an Escapist    Firstly, all the poets of Keats’s time were influenced by the ideas and ideals of the French Revolution. The ideas of the French Revolution had awakened the youthful nature of both Wordsworth and Coleridge; they had moved the wrath of Scott; they had worked like Yeats on Byron and brought …

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Oct 19

Explanation: If our two loves……… slacken, none can die from Good Morrow

Explanation: If our two loves……… slacken, none can die from Good Morrow Explanation: If our two loves be one, or thou and I Love so alike that none can slacken, none can die. These lines have been taken from the last two lines of “The Good Morrow”, composed by John Donne. Here, the speaker logically …

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Oct 19

Explanation: Yet she Will be False……. or three. from Song: Go, and Catch a Failing Star

Explanation: Yet she Will be False, ere I come, to two, or three. These are the last lines of the “Song: Go, and Catch a Failing Star” composed by John Donne. Here, he mentions his negative thinking towards the women who are both fair and faithful.

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Oct 03

Locksley Hall by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Locksley Hall by Alfred, Lord Tennyson Complete Text COMRADES, leave me here a little, while as yet ’tis early morn: Leave me here, and when you want me, sound upon the bugle horn. ’Tis the place, and all around it, as of old, the curlews call, Dreary gleams about the moorland flying over Locksley Hall; Locksley …

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Oct 02

Critical Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 01

SONNET 1  William Shakespeare   From fairest creatures we desire increase, That thereby beauty’s rose might never die, But as the riper should by time decease, His tender heir might bear his memory: But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes, Feed’st thy light’s flame with self-substantial fuel, Making a famine where abundance lies, Thyself …

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Oct 02

Sonnet 2 of Shakespeare

SONNET 2 Analysis William Shakespeare   When forty winters shall beseige thy brow,  And dig deep trenches in thy beauty’s field, Thy youth’s proud livery, so gazed on now, Will be a tatter’d weed, of small worth held: Then being ask’d where all thy beauty lies, Where all the treasure of thy lusty days, To …

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Oct 01

Theme and Language of William Wordsworth

 Theme of William Wordsworth: 1. William Wordsworth has chosen incidence and situation from common life in the rural areas and described them ‘in a selection of language really used by men’. But this selection of common life does not mean photographic reproduction. He has given to the ordinary incidence a coloring of imagination to present …

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Sep 28

Mathew Arnold’s Estimates of Various Poets

Discuss about Mathew Arnold’s estimates of various poets. 1. Geoffrey Chaucer: a. Chaucer’s poetry is superior to the French Roman’s poetry of the 12th and 13th Centuries; but his greatness does not lie in the historical estimate alone. The great superiority of Chaucer’s poetry lies in matter and manner of his poetry. Arnold says that, Dryden was …

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