Explanation: Comrades, you have heard already about the strange dream that I had last night. from Animal Farm.

Explanation 01: Comrades, you have heard already about the strange dream that I had last night. 

The speech has been mentioned from George Orwell’s most popular and revolutionary story ‘Animal Farm’. Here the speech is an old pig named Mr. Pilkington who represents Churchill in Allegorical term. Continue reading

Explanation: “Never mind the milk, comrades!…… in front of the buckets. from Animal Farm

Explanation 02: “Never mind the milk, comrades! Cried Napoleon, placing himself in front of the buckets.”

 The line is extracted from George Orwell’s famous story ‘Animal Farm’. Here Napoleon speeches the speech to the animals.

After many difficulties, the animals gain their liberty from Mr. John and make many new rules and regulations for their own safety. Continue reading

Allegorical symbols of Animal Farm

 Mr. John:  Mr. John represents the capitalism.

Mr. Pilkington: Mr. Pilkington represents Churchill who was the prime minister of England.

Major: Major represents Karl Marx who led Russian revolution.

Napoleon: Napoleon represents Stalin.

Snowball: Snowball represents Trotsky who was a Russian leader.

Boxer: Boxer represents the hard working Russian proletariat (public) under Stalin.   

 

Major in Animal Farm

Short Note about Major in Animal Farm

Major is the name of an old boar on Manor Farm which is owned by Mr. Jones. He is twelve years old and becomes a wise pig. In the beginning of this story we meet with him. One night when he had seen a strange dream he calls a secret meeting of all animals on the farm and makes them conscious against Mr. Johns. In the meeting he tells the animals that their lives are miserable, laborious and short. No animal in England knows what leisure is. Continue reading

Mollie in Animal Farm

Short note about Mollie in Animal Farm

Mollie is the name of a foolish, pretty and white mare that used to draw Mr. John’s carriage. In allegorical term, Mollie represents the white Russians. She is fond of wearing red ribbons in her white mane and of chewing lumps of sugar. When the animals are making preparation for a rebellion against Mr. Johns at that time Mollie asks Snowball, “Will there still be sugar after the rebellion?” she then asks another question after the rebellion whether she will be allowed to wear ribbons in her mane. Continue reading

Snowball in Animal Farm

Short note about Snowball in Animal Farm

Animal Farm is a familiar satiric story of George Orwell. In this story, Snowball is the pig who reads out the seven commandments which they have made for their own safety and continue their activities after achieving freedom from Mr. Johns. In the war he plays an important role which helps the animals and encourages them to protect their enemy, as a result they win the war. Snowball is the one who throws the ribbons into fire with which the horses, manes and tails have usually been decorated by Mr. Johns’ men on market days. Continue reading